Martin Creed, ‘Work No. 1273’, 2011, Joanna Bryant & Julian Page

Only available as part of the complete framed set of 12 Official Prints from the London Olympic and Paralympic Games 2012: Anthea Hamilton - Divers, Martin Creed - Work No. 1273, Howard Hodgkin – Swimming, Bridget Riley – Rose Rose, Chris Ofili - For the Unknown Runner, Rachel Whiteread – LOndOn 2O12, Fiona Banner - Superhuman Nude, Michael Craig-Martin – GO, Tracey Emin - Birds 2012, Gary Hume – Capital, Sarah Morris - Big Ben 2012, Bob and Roberta Smith - LOVE.

Lithograph on 300gsm Somerset White Tub sized paper.

For 'Work No.1273', Creed has made five single brush marks using a palette derived from the Olympic colours. The marks are arranged in an ascending form that seems to represent an extended podium offering places beyond first, second and third. Creed's image can be seen as expressing his respect for the excellence of all competing Olympic sportsmen and women.
Since 1912, each Olympic Host City has commissioned one or more posters to celebrate the hosting of the Games. The official posters of the Games are now themselves a unique celebration of 100 years of the meeting of art and sport, and a body of iconic work has been created over the last century. For London 2012, a commissioning panel including Tate Director Sir Nicholas Serota invited 12 leading artists to create images, using the Olympic and Paralympic values or the city of London as inspiration. Each resulting artwork is a distinct interpretation of either the Olympic or Paralympic Games.

About Martin Creed

Merging art and life, Martin Creed uses ordinary materials and everyday situations to create multimedia works that have confounded and delighted viewers and critics for nearly 30 years. He rejects the term “conceptual” and calls himself an “expressionist,” referring to his notion that all art stems from feeling. His works run the gamut from deadpan, minimalist interventions to rapidly rendered, expressionistic portraits. He approaches art making with humor, anxiety, and experimentation, and with the sensibility of a musician and composer, underpinning everything he does with his open ambiguity about what art is. In 2001, he was awarded the Turner Prize for Work No 227: The Lights Going On and Off, which was exactly what its title describes, in an empty gallery. As Creed maintains: “Anything is art that is used as art by people.”

English, b. 1968, Wakefield, United Kingdom, based in London, United Kingdom