Skip to Main Content
Massimo Vignelli, ‘Pair Of Pendant Lamps, Italy’, 1960s, Rago/Wright
Massimo Vignelli, ‘Pair Of Pendant Lamps, Italy’, 1960s, Rago/Wright
Save
Save
Share
Share
Save
Save
Share
Share

Pair Of Pendant Lamps, Italy, 1960s

Cased Glass, Brass, Single Sockets
Bidding closed
About the work
RW
Rago/Wright

Glass only: 14" x 6" dia.

Glass only: 14" x 6" dia.

Medium
Design/Decorative Art
Signature
Unmarked
Massimo Vignelli
Italian, 1931–2014
Follow

Massimo Vignelli shaped the visual landscape of mid-century America and created designs that we continue to encounter to this day. In collaboration with his wife Lella, the Italian designer established now-familiar corporate identities for companies such as American Airlines, Knoll International, and Bloomingdales. He also designed the network of signage used to navigate the New York City subway. In use since 1972, Vignelli’s wayfinding system identifies subway lines by numbers and letters set within colored circles, and his graphic signs feature highly legible white-on-black text intended to help millions find their way across the city. Vignelli’s clean, grid-based compositions, dynamic application of color, and commitment to sans-serif typefaces set a standard for American graphic design, particularly in public institutions, and established Helvetica as the country’s most ubiquitous font.

Venini
Follow
Massimo Vignelli, ‘Pair Of Pendant Lamps, Italy’, 1960s, Rago/Wright
Massimo Vignelli, ‘Pair Of Pendant Lamps, Italy’, 1960s, Rago/Wright
Save
Save
Share
Share
Save
Save
Share
Share
About the work
RW
Rago/Wright

Glass only: 14" x 6" dia.

Glass only: 14" x 6" dia.

Medium
Design/Decorative Art
Signature
Unmarked
Massimo Vignelli
Italian, 1931–2014
Follow

Massimo Vignelli shaped the visual landscape of mid-century America and created designs that we continue to encounter to this day. In collaboration with his wife Lella, the Italian designer established now-familiar corporate identities for companies such as American Airlines, Knoll International, and Bloomingdales. He also designed the network of signage used to navigate the New York City subway. In use since 1972, Vignelli’s wayfinding system identifies subway lines by numbers and letters set within colored circles, and his graphic signs feature highly legible white-on-black text intended to help millions find their way across the city. Vignelli’s clean, grid-based compositions, dynamic application of color, and commitment to sans-serif typefaces set a standard for American graphic design, particularly in public institutions, and established Helvetica as the country’s most ubiquitous font.

Venini
Follow

Pair Of Pendant Lamps, Italy, 1960s

Cased Glass, Brass, Single Sockets
Bidding closed
Other works by Massimo Vignelli