Mathieu Matégot, ‘Georges Jouve and Mathieu Matégot Ashtray, circa 1950’, ca. 1950, DADA STUDIOS

Ashtray designed by Georges Jouve and Mathieu Matégot.
Manufactured in France, circa 1950.
Green ceramic, metal and rattan.

Signed.

In good condition, with minor wear consistent with age and use, preserving a beautiful patina.

Mathieu Matégot (1910-2001) was a Hungarian and French designer and material artist. He was one of the most renowned French designers of the 1950s. Born and educated in Budapest, he moved to France in the early 1930s, where he worked as a window dresser and women’s clothing designer. He learned metalworking techniques as a prisoner of war in the 1940s and upon his release began designing furniture, pioneering many of what we now identify as Midcentury design tropes, like metal-mounted rattan, steel tubing and perforated sheet metal. By the 1970s, Mate´got returned to producing tapestries.

Georges Jouve is an important ceramist of the 20th century. He was born in 1910 in Fontenay-sous-Bois and his parents were both decorators. He opened his studio in Paris and was invited by Jacques Adnet to participate in the exhibition “La Ceramique Contemporaine” by the Compagnie des Arts Francais. He then participated annually in numerous 'Salons' in France and internationally such as the “Salon des Artistes Decorateurs” in Paris, Association Francaise d'Action Artistique in Rio de Janeiro and Vienna, Toronto, Rome, Milan and Cairo.

Manufacturer: Atelier Matégot

About Mathieu Matégot

Born and educated in Budapest, furniture and tapestry designer Mathieu Matégot moved to France in the early 1930s, where he worked as a window dresser and women’s clothing designer. He learned metalworking techniques as a prisoner of war in the 1940s, and upon his release began designing furniture, pioneering many of what we now identify as midcentury design tropes, like metal-mounted rattan, steel tubing, and perforated sheet metal. By the 1970s, Matégot returned to producing tapestries, many of which evoke Abstract Expressionist paintings.

Hungarian-French, 1910-2001