Max Ernst, ‘The King Playing with the Queen’, 1944, Nasher Sculpture Center

cast 1954

Signature: Numbered only Left side of base, lower left: 'III'

1987 A Century of Modern Sculpture: The Patsy and Raymond Nasher Collection, Dallas Museum of Art, April 5 - May 31, 1987; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., June 28, 1987 - January 3, 1988; Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid, April 4 - June 5, 1988; Forte Belvedere, Florence, Italy, July 8 - October 16, 1988; Tel Aviv Museum of Art, January 1 - March 31, 1989. Exhibition catalogue. 1990 Max Ernst: The Sculpture, The Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh, Scotland, August 11 - September 23, 1990. 1996 A Century of Sculpture: The Nasher Collection, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, October 26, 1996 - January 12, 1997; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, February 6 - June 1, 1997. Exhibition catalogue. 2003 From Rodin to Calder: Masterworks of Modern Sculpture from the Nasher Collection, Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas, October 20, 2003 - September 2004. 2004 Bodies Past and Present: The Figurative Tradition in the Nasher Collection, Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas, September 2004 - July 2005. 2008 In Pursuit of the Masters: Stories from the Raymond and Patsy Nasher Collection, Nasher Sculpture Center, September 20, 2008 – January 4, 2009. Exhibition pamphlet.

Artist
Dorothea Tanning
Raymond and Patsy Nasher Collection, 1984

About Max Ernst

Closely associated with Dada and Surrealism, Max Ernst made paintings, sculptures, and prints depicting fantastic, nightmarish images that often made reference to anxieties originating in childhood. Ernst demonstrated a profound interest in Freudian psychoanalysis, which is apparent in his exploration of Automatism and his invention of the Frottage technique. The artist’s psychoanalytic leanings are evident in his iconic 1923 work Pietà, or Revolution by Night, in which Ernst substitutes the image of Mary cradling the body of Christ with a depiction of the artist himself held by his father. Much of the artist’s work defied societal norms, Christian morality, and the aesthetic standards of Western academic art.

French-American, b. Germany, 1891-1976, Brühl, nr Cologne, Germany