Meret Oppenheim, ‘Fur Bracelet ’, 2014, GEMS AND LADDERS
Meret Oppenheim, ‘Fur Bracelet ’, 2014, GEMS AND LADDERS
Meret Oppenheim, ‘Fur Bracelet ’, 2014, GEMS AND LADDERS

In 1936 the young Meret Oppenheim met Pablo Picasso and Dora Maar at the Café de Flore in Paris wearing a fur covered bracelet. The bracelet – which the artist fashioned using a brass tube – so delighted her companions that a conversation ensued during which Oppenheim’s best known work, a fur-covered cup, saucer and spoon, was conceived. André Breton, the founder of Surrealism, christened this Le déjeuner en fourrure (Lunch in fur, 1936,) and to this day it remains one of the most frequently cited Surrealist pieces. Meret Oppenheim’s sketches of the original bracelet note that it should be gilt, as it is produced here. Her own version was given as a present to Aube Breton Elléoüet, Breton’s daughter.

About Meret Oppenheim

A central figure in Surrealism, Meret Oppenheim painted dream narratives and impossible juxtapositions of everyday objects to explore female sexuality, identity, and exploitation. She famously posed for Man Ray’s Erotique voilée (1933), instantly becoming an object of romantic idealization to the Surrealists for her seemingly direct and spontaneous access to experiences of the dream world through her youth, charm, and openness. In her best-known works, Oppenheim painted household objects in suggestively erotic arrangements or created haunting assemblages of indeterminate origins, often transforming objects closely associated with feminine domesticity into erotic symbols. Object (1936), a fur-covered cup, saucer, and spoon, became her most iconic work. Through exhibitions and activities amongst the Surrealist circle, Oppenheim was closely associated with Jean Arp, André Breton, and Max Ernst.

German-Swiss, 1913-1985, Charlottenburg, Germany