Meret Oppenheim, ‘Table with Bird's Feet ’, 2014, GEMS AND LADDERS
Meret Oppenheim, ‘Table with Bird's Feet ’, 2014, GEMS AND LADDERS

Soon after René Drouin and Leo Castelli opened their gallery on the Place Vendôme in Paris in 1939 they invited artists, including Max Ernst and Alberto Giacometti, to take part in an exhibition of fantastical furniture. One of Meret Oppenheim’s contributions to the show was this table with bird’s feet, which has now been reproduced in a final approved edition. Marks of large bird feet can be traced on the gilt, oval table top, as if fleeting imprints had been fossilized, but the great interloper is no longer in sight. Beneath this, however, the table legs end in huge brass claws poised to run away, suggesting that the domestic realm can harbour unexpected, independent, bodies.

About Meret Oppenheim

A central figure in Surrealism, Meret Oppenheim painted dream narratives and impossible juxtapositions of everyday objects to explore female sexuality, identity, and exploitation. She famously posed for Man Ray’s Erotique voilée (1933), instantly becoming an object of romantic idealization to the Surrealists for her seemingly direct and spontaneous access to experiences of the dream world through her youth, charm, and openness. In her best-known works, Oppenheim painted household objects in suggestively erotic arrangements or created haunting assemblages of indeterminate origins, often transforming objects closely associated with feminine domesticity into erotic symbols. Object (1936), a fur-covered cup, saucer, and spoon, became her most iconic work. Through exhibitions and activities amongst the Surrealist circle, Oppenheim was closely associated with Jean Arp, André Breton, and Max Ernst.

German-Swiss, 1913-1985, Charlottenburg, Germany

Solo Shows on Artsy

2014
Meret Oppenheim: Tender Friendships, National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington

Group Shows on Artsy

2014
The Amusing Style, Pavel Zoubok Gallery, New York