Michael Craig-Martin, ‘GO’, 2011, Joanna Bryant & Julian Page

Only available as part of the complete framed set of 12 Official Prints from the London Olympic and Paralympic Games 2012: Anthea Hamilton - Divers, Martin Creed - Work No. 1273, Howard Hodgkin – Swimming, Bridget Riley – Rose Rose, Chris Ofili - For the Unknown Runner, Rachel Whiteread – LOndOn 2O12, Fiona Banner - Superhuman Nude, Michael Craig-Martin – GO, Tracey Emin - Birds 2012, Gary Hume – Capital, Sarah Morris - Big Ben 2012, Bob and Roberta Smith - LOVE.
Six colour screen print on 410gsm Somerset Satin paper.
Michael Craig-Martin combines quotidian objects such as light bulbs, chairs, and umbrellas with everyday words. His pairing of language and image is based on both familiar and unexpected associations. In combining the word GO with a stopwatch Craig-Martin conveys with a sense of immediacy the excitement and anticipation experienced in the moments before the starter pistol is fired, and the roar of the crowd as they encourage their favourite Paralympian towards the finish line.
Since 1912, each Olympic Host City has commissioned one or more posters to celebrate the hosting of the Games. The official posters of the Games are now themselves a unique celebration of 100 years of the meeting of art and sport, and a body of iconic work has been created over the last century. For London 2012, a commissioning panel including Tate Director Sir Nicholas Serota invited 12 leading artists to create images, using the Olympic and Paralympic values or the city of London as inspiration. Each resulting artwork is a distinct interpretation of either the Olympic or Paralympic Games.

About Michael Craig-Martin

Conceptual artist Michael Craig-Martin—who taught Damien Hirst, Gary Hume, and others at London's Goldsmiths College in the 1970s—is often called the godfather of the Young British Artists. His early work referenced Minimalism and Dada's depiction of mass-produced objects. These objects form Craig-Martin's most recognizable works, paintings in which about 200 familiar items (eyeglasses, milk bottles, scissors) are depicted both realistically and graphically, represented in lurid, unexpected color combinations and black outline. The seminal piece An Oak Tree (1973) consists of a glass of water on a shelf, paired with text declaring that the glass is, in fact, an oak tree.

Irish, b. 1941, Dublin, Ireland, based in Dublin, Ireland