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About Miwa Ogasawara

Black, white, and muted colors dominate Miwa Ogasawara’s paintings and drawings of interiors, landscapes, and people. Her compositions are characteristically sparse, her subjects unspectacular or ordinary, like an empty hallway or a close-up of someone’s knees. Ogasawara, who is fond of Vilhelm Hammershoi’s unembellished way of painting interiors and portraits, explains that she makes her work about “an extended moment, a slightly displaced presence.” Though she does not usually work in series, many subjects recur in her work: beds, limbs, refracted light, shadows, doorways, and windows. In both her paintings and ink drawings, Ogasawara uses thick and visible brushwork, even as she oscillates between depicting geometric and softer forms. Critics refer to her works as representational but without narrative.

Japanese, b. 1973, Kyoto, Japan, based in Hamburg, Germany