Mon Levinson, ‘Knife Drawing Mixed Media Sculpture (Tondo VI)’, 1962-1963, Alpha 137 Gallery
Mon Levinson, ‘Knife Drawing Mixed Media Sculpture (Tondo VI)’, 1962-1963, Alpha 137 Gallery
Mon Levinson, ‘Knife Drawing Mixed Media Sculpture (Tondo VI)’, 1962-1963, Alpha 137 Gallery
Mon Levinson, ‘Knife Drawing Mixed Media Sculpture (Tondo VI)’, 1962-1963, Alpha 137 Gallery
Mon Levinson, ‘Knife Drawing Mixed Media Sculpture (Tondo VI)’, 1962-1963, Alpha 137 Gallery
Mon Levinson, ‘Knife Drawing Mixed Media Sculpture (Tondo VI)’, 1962-1963, Alpha 137 Gallery

This is a unique mixed media construction by Op Art sculptor Mon Levinson that was part of his Knife Series of constructions that were first shown in 1961 at the Jill Kornblee Gallery. This work was acquired from the Estate of Dr. Arthur Carr, a professor at Columbia University and an important early supporter and collector of Pop Art. This work is accompanied by a xerox copy of Dr. Carr's original January 1963 receipt from the Kornblee gallery for this work, including the sales tax he paid. (see jpeg)

Signature: The work is held in its original artist's frame. It has not been examined outside of the frame, but it may be signed on the verso. Nonetheless it has terrific provenance as it is accompanied by a copy of the original bill of sale to renowned NYC collector Arthur Carr from the Kornblee Gallery -- Levinson's gallery of record in the early 1960s, who was, famously, the first gallery to show Levinson's important "Knife Drawing" constructions.

Jill Kornblee Gallery, 1018 Madison Avenue, NYC

Estate of art collector Dr. Arthur Carr, NYC
Jill Kornblee Gallery, 1018 Madison Avenue, NYC

About Mon Levinson

Considered one of the progenitors of Op art for his optically complex and illusionistic works, Mon Levinson masterfully manipulates perception with line, layers, light, and shadow. Influenced by Russian Suprematism and Constructivism, Levinson creates abstract compositions from the interplay of geometric shapes and parallel lines. In his earliest works, he layered cut paper and sheets of vinyl, imparting three-dimensionality to a two-dimensional surface, while with work in Plexiglas, Levinson has experimented with the effects of reflection and translucence, creating compelling compositions of light and shadow.

American, b. 1926, New York, New York