Moncho 1929, ‘6foot7foot8footjump’, 2017, Gallery 38

In Moncho's latest series of works, the notion of untold stories and how the anonymity of how these interactions affect connections. The note paper, sometime scribbled, sometimes blank is meant to show the frailty between the underlying story and what is portrayed. In "joyride monsters" the childhood experience of playing with an abandoned car, hiding behind the luxury of owning a car, sitting predominantly almost triumphantly in the driver's side are all resting on the thin sheet of scribbled notebook paper, holding up these dreams and identity markers. In "thanks for calling we're fine", the paper motif takes a personal tone buy obscuring the faces of Puerto Rican women, almost hiding their identities but failing to hide their strength and determination. The paper masks are meant to denote how thin the veil of obscurity and being hidden often is. The women are seemingly of different races but are meant to show the racial diversity within afro-caribbean families. This work as well as "this mountain wasn't big enough" were done after the hurricane disaster recently to occur in Puerto Rico and also speak of hidden political identities and the notion of "second class citizens" that most Puerto Ricans see themselves to be as an occupied territory of the United States.

In Moncho's latest series of works, the notion of untold stories and how the anonymity of how these interactions affect connections. The note paper, sometime scribbled, sometimes blank is meant to show the frailty between the underlying story and what is portrayed. In "joyride monsters" the childhood experience of playing with an abandoned car, hiding behind the luxury of owning a car, sitting predominantly almost triumphantly in the driver's side are all resting on the thin sheet of scribbled notebook paper, holding up these dreams and identity markers. In "thanks for calling we're fine", the paper motif takes a personal tone buy obscuring the faces of Puerto Rican women, almost hiding their identities but failing to hide their strength and determination. The paper masks are meant to denote how thin the veil of obscurity and being hidden often is. The women are seemingly of different races but are meant to show the racial diversity within afro-caribbean families. This work as well as "this mountain wasn't big enough" were done after the hurricane disaster recently to occur in Puerto Rico and also speak of hidden political identities and the notion of "second class citizens" that most Puerto Ricans see themselves to be as an occupied territory of the United States.

Collection of the Artist

About Moncho 1929

Dan Montevaro’s work can be seen in the galleries and streets of New York and Los Angeles. His work under his other ‘street’ name Moncho1929 is reflective of sociopolitical issues and animal-inspired art with a strong commentary on survival, preservation, police brutality and the trappings of fame. He studied fine art at Buffalo University in New York and was an apprentice sculptor at St. John the Divine Cathedral in New York City. Originally from New York, Monteavaro has shown his work both nationally and internationally. His murals are
archived with the Los Angeles Mural Conservancy and the Google Street Art Project.

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