Morris Louis, ‘Blue Pilaster II’, 1960, Heritage Auctions
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Morris Louis

Blue Pilaster II, 1960

Acrylic resin (Magna) on canvas
83 × 23 1/2 in
210.8 × 59.7 cm
Bidding closed
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About the work
Bibliography
Provenance
HA
Heritage Auctions

Framed: 84.5in x 25.25in x 0in

It was a seemingly-ordinary visit to New York City in 1953 that …

Medium
Painting
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Courtesy of Heritage Auctions
Morris Louis
American, 1912–1962
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Known for his vivid “stain” paintings, Morris Louis was an American Abstract Expressionist and color field painter. Rather than adopt the gestural and painterly style of contemporaries Willem de Kooning and Jackson Pollock, Louis instead took to pouring diluted paint directly onto the canvas, letting pigments soak into the support in brightly colored bands. He often left large areas of the canvas untouched, with the negative space playing a significant role in his work, as in Gamma Omicron (1960); his initial inspiration for this method is said to come from a visit to the studio of Helen Frankenthaler, a pioneering stain painter. Working in the wake of Abstract Expressionism, Louis was part of the transitional movement dubbed Post-Painterly Abstraction by the influential critic Clement Greenberg; living in Washington D.C., he also joined the artistic group known as the Washington Color School.

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Morris Louis, ‘Blue Pilaster II’, 1960, Heritage Auctions
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Save
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View
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About the work
Bibliography
Provenance
HA
Heritage Auctions

Framed: 84.5in x 25.25in x 0in

It was a seemingly-ordinary visit to New York City in 1953 that redirected the career of 41-year-old Morris Louis and dramatically shifted Abstract Expressionism toward Color Field painting. For 20 years, against the better judgment of his Russian-Jewish immigrant family, Louis led a …

Medium
Painting
Image rights
Courtesy of Heritage Auctions
Morris Louis
American, 1912–1962
Follow

Known for his vivid “stain” paintings, Morris Louis was an American Abstract Expressionist and color field painter. Rather than adopt the gestural and painterly style of contemporaries Willem de Kooning and Jackson Pollock, Louis instead took to pouring diluted paint directly onto the canvas, letting pigments soak into the support in brightly colored bands. He often left large areas of the canvas untouched, with the negative space playing a significant role in his work, as in Gamma Omicron (1960); his initial inspiration for this method is said to come from a visit to the studio of Helen Frankenthaler, a pioneering stain painter. Working in the wake of Abstract Expressionism, Louis was part of the transitional movement dubbed Post-Painterly Abstraction by the influential critic Clement Greenberg; living in Washington D.C., he also joined the artistic group known as the Washington Color School.

Morris Louis

Blue Pilaster II, 1960

Acrylic resin (Magna) on canvas
83 × 23 1/2 in
210.8 × 59.7 cm
Bidding closed
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
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