Nathan Mabry, ‘Icky-Bana (Standing Woman III/ Oiseau-Tête)’, 2012, TWO x TWO

Icky-Bana (Standing Woman III/oiseau- tête) comes from a series of work where Mabry combines altered ethnographic artifacts with minimalist-sculpture bases, perhaps paying homage to Giacometti’s Standing Woman III, located at LAMOCA.

Nathan Mabry has quickly established himself as one the most interesting emerging artists on the West Coast by creating sculptures that embrace different stylistic associations and reference art objects throughout history. Mabry opens up defined history by investigating the relationship between the institutionally-authorized Minimal object and the anonymous ethnographic one. His works simultaneously tease and surpass the viewer’s expectations while engaging with the nuances and complexities of contemporary society. Icky-Bana (Standing Woman III/oiseau- tête) comes from a series of work where Mabry combines altered ethnographic artifacts with minimalist-sculpture bases, perhaps paying homage to Giacometti’s Standing Woman III, located at LA MOCA. Nathan Mabry lives and works in Los Angeles. His work is in the permanent collections of numerous institutions including the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; and the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego. His work has recently appeared in exhibitions at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego; Las Vegas Art Museum; and the 176 Zabludowicz Collection, London. He was the subject of a solo exhibition at the Nasher Sculpture Center earlier this year.

About Nathan Mabry

With iconoclastic fervor, sculptor Nathan Mabry melds antiquity with the contemporary, producing works in wood, plaster, and clay that satirize both ethnographic art and its modernist derivates. Invoking pre-Columbian artifacts, early modernist sculpture, pop culture, Minimalism, and a plethora of other references, Mabry samples and appropriates in order to question the narratives of progress that frame the history of Western art, and to interrogate the values and meanings of his sources. Mabry reimagines Auguste Rodin’s The Kiss (1889) so that it becomes a grotesque, provocative effigy, and performs interventions on classical sculptures, giving their iconic and revered forms leering masked faces or fluorescent afro wigs. Mabry studied at UCLA under the satirist Paul McCarthy, a major influence on his work and from whom he has taken many of his visual clues.

American, b. 1978, Durango, Colorado, based in Los Angeles, California

Solo Shows

2016
Cherry and Martin, 
Los Angeles,
2014
Cherry and Martin, 
Los Angeles,
Nathan Mabry: GOODGOD

Group Shows

2017