Nick Hornby, ‘BACK TOWARDS FLAT’, 2013, TWO x TWO

estimated retail value: $6,000

In Back Towards Flat, Hornby uses Photoshop to continue Henri Matisse’s iconic series of four bas-relief bronze sculptures that showed the back of a woman progressing from representation to abstraction. Hornby proposes two further abstractions, where the left and right sides of the body become increasingly geometric and separate.

Dimensions: 30 x 20 1/2 in each

In his recent work, British sculptor Nick Hornby uses modern technology to analyze and extrapolate on art and architecture from the past, in some instances bringing a central motif of the work into a hypothetical present. In Back Towards Flat, Hornby uses Photoshop to continue Henri Matisse’s iconic series of four bas-relief bronze sculptures that showed the back of a woman progressing from representation to abstraction. Hornby proposes two further abstractions, where the left and right sides of the body become increasingly geometric and separate. Hornby’s work is not just a meditation on Matisse’s sculptural endeavors, but also a comment on how technology helps us visualize and connect with history. Hornby has exhibited at institutions such as Tate Britain; Eyebeam, New York; and The Hub, Athens. Hornby was a 2011 artist in residence at Eyebeam, New York. Hornby’s work was recently on view at the Museum of Art and Design, New York, in the exhibition Out of Hand: Materializing the Post-Digital.

gallery website: www.churnerandchurner.com

About Nick Hornby

When experienced in the round, Nick Hornby’s multifaceted and optically illusive sculptures appear to change drastically in silhouette. Each piece is a composite of multiple iconic art historic images that reveal themselves only from certain perspectives. Hornby calls these “quotations”; he also says that his works attempt “to find that place between the raw and the cooked—to make each object appear to have its own rationale, but also be unstable enough to unfold and reveal its origins.” He begins each sculpture by selecting his referential images, which he then combines using an algorithm. The final pieces are made of a marble and resin composite, and cut by a company that specializes in sculpting the hulls of yachts.

British, b. 1980, based in London, United Kingdom

Group Shows on Artsy

2016
2015
Collaborative works II, CHOI&LAGER, Köln