Olafur Eliasson, ‘Jökulsgilskvisl (Glacier Canyon Fork), from Double Exposure’, 2003, Photography, The complete set of two chromogenic prints, on photo paper flush-mounted to Forex board (as issued), the full sheets., Phillips
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Olafur Eliasson

Jökulsgilskvisl (Glacier Canyon Fork), from Double Exposure, 2003

The complete set of two chromogenic prints, on photo paper flush-mounted to Forex board (as issued), the full sheets.
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Phillips

Property Subject to Artist's Resale Right (see Conditions of Sale for further information)

both …

Medium
Signature
Both signed in black ink and numbered 'H.C. 2/2' in pencil on a label affixed to the reverse (one of 2 hors commerce sets, the edition was …
Olafur Eliasson
Danish-Icelandic, b. 1967
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“It is not just about decorating the world… but about taking responsibility,” Olafur Eliasson said of his practice in a 2009 TED Talk. Eliasson uses natural elements (like light, water, fog) and makeshift technical devices to transform museum galleries and public areas into immersive environments. Prompting reflection on the spaces surrounding us, for Green River (1998-2001) he poured bright green (environmentally safe) dye into rivers running through downtown L.A., Stockholm, Tokyo, and other cities to “show the turbulence in these downtown areas” and to remind passersby of the cities’ vitality. Similarly, by installing four large waterfalls in New York’s East River (2008), he intended to give the city a sense of dimension; Eliasson also famously installed a giant artificial sun inside the Tate Modern (The weather project, 2003). Known for their elegant simplicity and lack of materiality, his installations are rooted in a belief that art can create a space sensitive to both individual and collective.

Olafur Eliasson, ‘Jökulsgilskvisl (Glacier Canyon Fork), from Double Exposure’, 2003, Photography, The complete set of two chromogenic prints, on photo paper flush-mounted to Forex board (as issued), the full sheets., Phillips
Save
Save
Share
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P
Phillips

Property Subject to Artist's Resale Right (see Conditions of Sale for further information)

both S. 40 x 60 cm (15 3/4 x 23 5/8 in.)

From the Catalogue:
"Olafur Eliasson belongs to a generation of artists who in the 90's explored and expanded the boundaries between art, science and nature and the perception …

Medium
Signature
Both signed in black ink and numbered 'H.C. 2/2' in pencil on a label affixed to the reverse (one of 2 hors commerce sets, the edition was …
Olafur Eliasson
Danish-Icelandic, b. 1967
Follow

“It is not just about decorating the world… but about taking responsibility,” Olafur Eliasson said of his practice in a 2009 TED Talk. Eliasson uses natural elements (like light, water, fog) and makeshift technical devices to transform museum galleries and public areas into immersive environments. Prompting reflection on the spaces surrounding us, for Green River (1998-2001) he poured bright green (environmentally safe) dye into rivers running through downtown L.A., Stockholm, Tokyo, and other cities to “show the turbulence in these downtown areas” and to remind passersby of the cities’ vitality. Similarly, by installing four large waterfalls in New York’s East River (2008), he intended to give the city a sense of dimension; Eliasson also famously installed a giant artificial sun inside the Tate Modern (The weather project, 2003). Known for their elegant simplicity and lack of materiality, his installations are rooted in a belief that art can create a space sensitive to both individual and collective.

Olafur Eliasson

Jökulsgilskvisl (Glacier Canyon Fork), from Double Exposure, 2003

The complete set of two chromogenic prints, on photo paper flush-mounted to Forex board (as issued), the full sheets.
Bidding closed
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.

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