Oliver Beer, ‘Beautiful Continuity’, 2017, Make-A-Wish Foundation

Courtesy of Oliver Beer and Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac

Please note this work is sold unframed.

TAMIR’S WISH “TO RECEIVE A VIOLA AND PLAY WITH THE ISRAEL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA”
Tamir suffered from a brain tumor. Make-A-Wish staff member said: “There are times that magic happens right in front of our eyes which is so powerful, that even we have to take a few moments to realize that it’s not a dream.” That’s exactly what happened, as we sat and
watched Tamir practicing with the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra. Tamir’s wish was granted at the National Theater, the home of the Philharmonic in Tel Aviv, when he also received the viola he had dreamt of. After receiving the viola, Tamir was invited by the orchestra’s conductor, to practice with them during the dress rehearsal for “The Magic Flute”. The conductor, as well as the members of the orchestra, where amazed with Tamir’s talent and
musical abilities and invited him to perform with them at their upcoming concert. The impact on Tamir was hugely positive and playing with the orchestra at a real concert in front of hundreds of people was a dream come true, making him feel like a professional performer.
One of the team from Make-A-Wish Israel said, “There are times that magic happens right in front of our eyes which is so powerful that even we have to take a few moments to realise that it’s not a dream.”

This event is being run through Make-A-Wish Promotions Limited, a wholly owned subsidiary of Make-A-Wish Foundation® UK to which it gifts any profit. The Art of Wishes is a joint event and the profits will be split equally between Make-A-Wish Foundation® UK (295672/SC 037479) and Make-A-Wish Foundation® Israel (580258820).

Image rights: © OLIVER BEER. PHOTO: STEVE WHITE COURTESY GALERIE THADDAEUS ROPAC · LONDON · PARIS · SALZBURG

About Oliver Beer

Oliver Beer works at the intersection of architecture, sound and image, exploring the connections between space, objects and acoustics. Informed by his training in fine art, musical composition and film theory, his projects – often taking the form of large-scale installations, live performances, sculpture and video – are research-based and use original techniques to test and manipulate the experience of sound. Interested in the resonant frequencies of objects and architecture he devises work, which stimulates the unique voice of empty space. His ongoing Resonance Project (2007-) has transformed the Centre Pompidou, MoMA PS1, and an Ottoman hammam, during Istanbul Biennale (2015), into "architectural instruments" producing audible compositions born from their inherent notes. Performed by trained singers alongside two-dimensional sculptures, installations and films, which splice through recognizable objects and narratives, Beer encourages a re-assessment of sensory perception. As he has said of his sculptures, “These…are a way of hearing with our eyes – or seeing with our ears.”

Submitted by the artist’s studio

b. 1985