Otto Dix, ‘WERDEN’, ca. 1919, Galerie Valentien
Otto Dix, ‘WERDEN’, ca. 1919, Galerie Valentien
Otto Dix, ‘WERDEN’, ca. 1919, Galerie Valentien
Otto Dix, ‘WERDEN’, ca. 1919, Galerie Valentien
Otto Dix, ‘WERDEN’, ca. 1919, Galerie Valentien
Otto Dix, ‘WERDEN’, ca. 1919, Galerie Valentien
Otto Dix, ‘WERDEN’, ca. 1919, Galerie Valentien

The woodcuts on white vat paper slightly vary in size; they measure on average 36 x 30 cm. Each sheet is signed in pencil and numbered 2/5. The print mark, however, bears the number 4(!)
Karsch 339, 340 II, 343-345
This is the first of Dix‘ numerous portfolios and the one with the smallest edition (only 5 copies were ever printed). The combination of the woodcuts numbered 2/5, the slightly water damaged cover and the print mark no.4 suggests that portfolio no.4 was probably destroyed by water.
Certainly Florian Karsch, die Author of the catalogue raisonné, has never seen an original edition of the portfolio (Karsch cat.nor. 345) but knew the prints only from later prints of minor quality in the magazines „Menschen“ and “Neue Blätter für Kunst und Dichtung“.
Although the print „Ich, Maske“ (Karsch 342) is missing in this portfolio, it is probably the most complete edition of „Holzschnitt-Werk I“.
Stylistically the woodcuts mark a new turn for the artists, embedded in the Dresden DaDa movement, after the eventful years of World War 1.
The woodcuts are in excellent condition, the cover has slight water traces at the bottom and is overall a little withered.
Most rare.

Image rights: Galerie Valentien

Publisher: R. Kaemmerer

About Otto Dix

In his Expressionist prints and paintings, Otto Dix immortalized the unprecedented horrors of World War I and its crippling aftereffects on life in Berlin. Anguish radiates from Dix’s desolate landscapes of military trenches filled with barely distinguishable, decaying human remains, the legacy of the first industrialized war, while images of poor, disfigured, and lonely veterans invisible to passersby on the streets were comments on war’s unequal impact on different societal groups. Exploitation is also the theme of his “Femme Fatale” paintings, criticizing the narcissism that drove women to work the system in attempt to outdo one another—a representation of the social turmoil at the time. Along with George Grosz, Dix is widely considered one of the most important artists of the Neue Sachlichkeit (“New Objectivity”), a term used to characterize the turn of public attitudes in Weimar Germany toward the practical and functional and the art the emerged from it.

German, 1891-1969, Gera, Germany