HM
Hecho a Mano
Santa Fe

This offset lithograph from the portfolio "450 Years of Struggle: Homage to the Mexican People" reproduces a color lithograph by O'Higgins depicting a conquistador standing over a defeated Aztec army warrior who holds a codice. A temple in the background blazes afire.

Medium
Publisher
Taller Grafica Popular

Pablo O’Higgins began receiving his artistic training at the School of Fine Arts in San Diego, but at the age of 20 moved to Mexico, acting on his affinity with the revolutionary Mexican artists. He particularly admired the work of the Mexican muralists Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, and David Alfaro Siquerios; in fact, O’Higgins secured a position as a primary assistant to Rivera, who would become a lifetime friend and a mentor. His style became deeply influenced by the muralists’ dramatic and monumental realism, which he adopted in depicting images of labor and local inhabitants. O’Higgins also became politically active in the post-revolution art movement in Mexico. He was the only non-native to be included in the historic 1940 exhibition at the New York Museum of Modern Art, “Twenty Centuries of Mexican Art.”

Collected by a major museum
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2020
Edward T. Pollack Fine Arts at IFPDA Fine Art Print Fair Online Spring 2020Edward T. Pollack Fine Arts
Edward T. Pollack Fine Arts at IFPDA Fine Art Print Fair Online Fall 2020Edward T. Pollack Fine Arts
2018
¡VICTORIA! Selected Political Prints From Mexico (1910-1960)Hecho a Mano
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La Destrucción del México Antiguo, 1960

Offset lithograph
11 × 16 in
27.9 × 40.6 cm
.
$95
Location
Santa Fe
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HM
Hecho a Mano
Santa Fe

This offset lithograph from the portfolio "450 Years of Struggle: Homage to the Mexican …

Medium
Publisher
Taller Grafica Popular

Pablo O’Higgins began receiving his artistic training at the School of Fine Arts in San Diego, but at the age of 20 moved to Mexico, acting on his affinity with the revolutionary Mexican artists. He particularly admired the work of the Mexican muralists Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, and David Alfaro Siquerios; in fact, O’Higgins secured a position as a primary assistant to Rivera, who would become a lifetime friend and a mentor. His style became deeply influenced by the muralists’ dramatic and monumental realism, which he adopted in depicting images of labor and local inhabitants. O’Higgins also became politically active in the post-revolution art movement in Mexico. He was the only non-native to be included in the historic 1940 exhibition at the New York Museum of Modern Art, “Twenty Centuries of Mexican Art.”

Collected by a major museum
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)
Other works from ¡VICTORIA! Selected Political Prints From Mexico (1910-1960)
Other works by Pablo O'Higgins
Related works