Pablo Picasso, ‘Scène de Tauromachie’, 1962, Heritage Auctions
Pablo Picasso, ‘Scène de Tauromachie’, 1962, Heritage Auctions
Pablo Picasso, ‘Scène de Tauromachie’, 1962, Heritage Auctions
Pablo Picasso, ‘Scène de Tauromachie’, 1962, Heritage Auctions
Pablo Picasso, ‘Scène de Tauromachie’, 1962, Heritage Auctions
Pablo Picasso, ‘Scène de Tauromachie’, 1962, Heritage Auctions

NOTE: We wish to thank Claude Picasso for confirming the authenticity of this work, which is accompanied by his photo-certificate dated November 17, 2010. Scène de tauromachie is an ink drawing on paper that depicts a bullfighting scene, a reoccurring subject in Pablo Picasso's work specifically after the mid-1950s. The work, executed on December 12, 1962 while Picasso was living in the South of France, depicts a bull charging a picador and matador across the center of the page and Carmen printed just above in capital letters. Picasso drew inspiration from Carmen, a fictional woman from Prosper Mérimée's 1845 novella that was adapted into an opera of the same name by Georges Bizet. Carmen personified the themes of sex, love, and tragedy found consistently throughout his work. Picasso was born on October 25, 1881 in Málaga, Spain. It was here that he developed his interest in bullfighting and the ceremonious victory of man over beast. Throughout his career, he often portrayed himself as a bull or the mythical Minotaur. "If all the ways I have been along were marked on a map and joined up with a line, it might represent a Minotaur." –Courtesy of Heritage Auctions

Condition Reports: Framed Dimensions 27 X 33 Inches

Signature: Signed, dated and inscribed lower left: Pablo Picasso / 12.12.62 / Pour Janine et Francis Crémieux, leur ami

Francis and Janine Crémieux; Sotheby's New York, April 14, 1983, lot 175; Private collection, New York, acquired from the above.

About Pablo Picasso

A prolific and tireless innovator of art forms, Pablo Picasso impacted the course of 20th-century art with unparalleled magnitude. Inspired by African and Iberian art and developments in the world around him, Picasso contributed significantly to a number of artistic movements, notably Cubism, Surrealism, Neoclassicism, and Expressionism. Along with Georges Braque, Picasso is best known for pioneering Cubism in an attempt to reconcile three-dimensional space with the two-dimensional picture plane, once asking, “Are we to paint what’s on the face, what’s inside the face, or what’s behind it?” Responding to the Spanish Civil War, he painted his most famous work, Guernica (1937), whose violent images of anguished figures rendered in grisaille made it a definitive work of anti-war art. “Painting is not made to decorate apartments,” he said. “It’s an offensive and defensive weapon against the enemy.” Picasso’s sizable oeuvre includes over 20,000 paintings, prints, drawings, sculptures, ceramics, theater sets, and costume designs.

Spanish, 1881-1973, Malaga, Spain, based in Paris and Mougins, France