Paul Evans, ‘Phil Powell and Paul Evans Studio Silver Fish Scale Screen’, ca. 1960s, Todd Merrill Studio
Paul Evans, ‘Phil Powell and Paul Evans Studio Silver Fish Scale Screen’, ca. 1960s, Todd Merrill Studio
Paul Evans, ‘Phil Powell and Paul Evans Studio Silver Fish Scale Screen’, ca. 1960s, Todd Merrill Studio

Early Paul Evans and Phillip Lloyd Powell studio screen or room divider in three panels featuring a welded steel open “fish scale” pattern decorated with aluminum metal-leaf and black “ink.” The frame in off-white striate paint over American Black Walnut with steel piano hinges. In excellent original condition. An original commission from long-time Powell/Evans Studio client Mrs. Berman who commissioned multiple pieces by Powell and Evans in Argente, and silver leaf for her home in PA in the 1960s. Accompanied by a letter of authentication by Dorsey Reading, Studio Foreman who installed Mrs. Berman’s home. Can be flat mounted or used as a free standing screen. Similar example documented on page 94 of Modern Americana, Rizzoli 2008.

About Paul Evans

A former metalworker, Paul Evans set up his own design studio in 1955 and, over the course of decades, became known for his sculpture, furniture, and contributions to the American Studio Craft Movement in the ’70s. The musician Lenny Kravitz once called Evans’s work, which he collects, “stunningly beautiful, stunningly ugly, stunningly tacky, stunningly sophisticated.” His career is divided into phases, each of which is defined by different styles and materials—the latter of which have included copper, bronze, pewter, sculpted steel, and argente. Hallmarks of his work include high relief, abstractly patterned surfaces, combining gilding, gnarled wood, and metal filigree. He also embraced and pioneered the integration of technology into design, including features such as remote-controlled doors and shelves in his creations.

American, 1931-1987, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, based in New Hope, Pennsylvania

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