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RW
Rago/Wright
Medium
Signature
Blue Sevres stamp/3, incised B
Paul Milet

If anyone could be said to have ceramics in his blood, it is Paul Milet, son of Optat Milet, who was himself the son and grandson of a potter. Paul Milet entered his father's pottery workshop in the town of Sèvres in 1894 and for the next 36 years produced high-quality ceramics sold through Parisian shops and decorators. Because his aesthetic preferences kept pace with the fashions of the era, his early work favors the floral and whiplash ornamentation associated with the Art Nouveau era, while his later work is serene, simple, and glazed in high-contrast jazz-age colors. [Source: Jason Jacques]

Selected exhibitions
2018
Behind the Curtain: Treasures from the VaultJason Jacques Gallery
2015
Jason Jacques Inc. at TEFAF Maastricht 2015Jason Jacques Gallery
2013
George Hoentschel: Stoneware Love AffairJason Jacques Gallery

The Sèvres porcelain factory has produced objects and wares heralded for innovative design and technique since its founding in Vincennes, France in 1740. Named after the town to which it moved in 1756, Sèvres porcelain was considered the paragon of 18th-century European porcelain and prized for its cobalt oxide-infused glaze known as “bleu de Sèvres.” However, not until the factory’s 19th-century rebirth under the direction of Alexandre Brongniart did its output explode. Eighty-nine different cup models alone were decorated in styles ranging from Renaissance, to Gothic, to Neoclassical, its commissioned artisans often copying contemporary paintings as well as works by old masters, especially Raphael, onto the wares. Later, as Art Nouveau emerged, asymmetrical, organic forms predominated. Today, the French Ministry of Culture oversees the factory, which continues to produce contemporary designs as well as historical reproductions, as well as its related museum.

Collected by a major museum
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Selected exhibitions
2018
ceramic sequences by nendoSèvres Porcelain Manufactory
2015
Pius VII Faces Napoleon: The Papal Tiara in the Eagle's TalonsChâteau de Fontainebleau
From Sèvres to Fifth Avenue: French Porcelain at The Frick CollectionThe Frick Collection
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Paul Milet

Sevres, Japonesque Vase With Carp And Shrimp, France, ca. 1900

Glazed Stoneware
9 3/8 × 4 in
23.8 × 10.2 cm
Bidding closed
RW
Rago/Wright
Medium
Signature
Blue Sevres stamp/3, incised B
Paul Milet

If anyone could be said to have ceramics in his blood, it is Paul Milet, son of Optat Milet, who was himself the son and grandson of a potter. Paul Milet entered his father's pottery workshop in the town of Sèvres in 1894 and for the next 36 years produced high-quality ceramics sold through Parisian shops and decorators. Because his aesthetic preferences kept pace with the fashions of the era, his early work favors the floral and whiplash ornamentation associated with the Art Nouveau era, while his later work is serene, simple, and glazed in high-contrast jazz-age colors. [Source: Jason Jacques]

Selected exhibitions (3)

The Sèvres porcelain factory has produced objects and wares heralded for innovative design and technique since its founding in Vincennes, France in 1740. Named after the town to which it moved in 1756, Sèvres porcelain was considered the paragon of 18th-century European porcelain and prized for its cobalt oxide-infused glaze known as “bleu de Sèvres.” However, not until the factory’s 19th-century rebirth under the direction of Alexandre Brongniart did its output explode. Eighty-nine different cup models alone were decorated in styles ranging from Renaissance, to Gothic, to Neoclassical, its commissioned artisans often copying contemporary paintings as well as works by old masters, especially Raphael, onto the wares. Later, as Art Nouveau emerged, asymmetrical, organic forms predominated. Today, the French Ministry of Culture oversees the factory, which continues to produce contemporary designs as well as historical reproductions, as well as its related museum.

Collected by a major museum
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Selected exhibitions (3)
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