Medium
Image rights
©The Estate of Philip Guston

In the 1950s, Philip Guston became famous for his brushy, gestural canvases and his associations with the Abstract Expressionist movement—then rejected this style to make totemic, socially conscious figurations during the latter half of his career. By the 1960s, Guston was making paintings that featured hooded Klansmen, detached limbs, and references to his own studio practice. In the 1970s, the Nixon administration became a frequent subject of Guston’s satirical drawings and paintings. Light bulbs, shoes, and cigarettes were other frequent motifs. While Guston’s move away from abstraction at first won him only critical disgust, his fearless experimentation and unique aesthetic evolution eventually won him admirers around the world. His work has been exhibited in New York, London, Los Angeles, Basel, Mexico City, and Amsterdam, and belongs in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Centre Pompidou, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Stedelijk Museum, among many others.

High auction record
US$25.9m, Christie's, 2013
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, Anderson Collection at Stanford University
Selected exhibitions
2020
Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925-1945Whitney Museum of American Art
2016
The Doris and Donald Fisher CollectionSan Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
2014
Painting, Smoking, Eating – late works by Philip GustonLouisiana Museum of Modern Art
View all

The Studio, 1969

Oil on canvas
71 × 73 3/10 in
180.3 × 186.1 cm
Location
Humlebaek
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
Medium
Image rights
©The Estate of Philip Guston

In the 1950s, Philip Guston became famous for his brushy, gestural canvases and his associations with the Abstract Expressionist movement—then rejected this style to make totemic, socially conscious figurations during the latter half of his career. By the 1960s, Guston was making paintings that featured hooded Klansmen, detached limbs, and references to his own studio practice. In the 1970s, the Nixon administration became a frequent subject of Guston’s satirical drawings and paintings. Light bulbs, shoes, and cigarettes were other frequent motifs. While Guston’s move away from abstraction at first won him only critical disgust, his fearless experimentation and unique aesthetic evolution eventually won him admirers around the world. His work has been exhibited in New York, London, Los Angeles, Basel, Mexico City, and Amsterdam, and belongs in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Centre Pompidou, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Stedelijk Museum, among many others.

High auction record
US$25.9m, Christie's, 2013
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, Anderson Collection at Stanford University
Selected exhibitions (3)

Series by this artist

Related works