Phillip Lloyd Powell, ‘Fine Wall-Hanging Cabinet, New Hope, PA’, 1961, Rago
Phillip Lloyd Powell, ‘Fine Wall-Hanging Cabinet, New Hope, PA’, 1961, Rago
Phillip Lloyd Powell, ‘Fine Wall-Hanging Cabinet, New Hope, PA’, 1961, Rago
Phillip Lloyd Powell, ‘Fine Wall-Hanging Cabinet, New Hope, PA’, 1961, Rago
Phillip Lloyd Powell, ‘Fine Wall-Hanging Cabinet, New Hope, PA’, 1961, Rago
Phillip Lloyd Powell, ‘Fine Wall-Hanging Cabinet, New Hope, PA’, 1961, Rago
Phillip Lloyd Powell, ‘Fine Wall-Hanging Cabinet, New Hope, PA’, 1961, Rago
Phillip Lloyd Powell, ‘Fine Wall-Hanging Cabinet, New Hope, PA’, 1961, Rago
Phillip Lloyd Powell, ‘Fine Wall-Hanging Cabinet, New Hope, PA’, 1961, Rago
Phillip Lloyd Powell, ‘Fine Wall-Hanging Cabinet, New Hope, PA’, 1961, Rago

Signature: Carved P 61

Family of original owners. Copy of original invoice available.

About Phillip Lloyd Powell

Often described as a “midcentury modernist”, American designer Phillip Lloyd Powell created pieces that transcended the Modernist style in both form and application. Instead of using industrial methods and techniques for production, the designer practiced hand carving as a way to bring out the natural form of the wood through careful manipulation. He is best known for his cabinets, which when opened would reveal beautiful detailing inside, as well as interiors lined with silver leaf or fabric. Besides wood, Powell favored modern materials like metal, stone, and slate to create the clean and precise lines that would become a trademark of his designs.

American, 1919-2008, Germantown, Pennsylvania, based in New Hope, Pennsylvania

About Paul Evans

A former metalworker, Paul Evans set up his own design studio in 1955 and, over the course of decades, became known for his sculpture, furniture, and contributions to the American Studio Craft Movement in the ’70s. The musician Lenny Kravitz once called Evans’s work, which he collects, “stunningly beautiful, stunningly ugly, stunningly tacky, stunningly sophisticated.” His career is divided into phases, each of which is defined by different styles and materials—the latter of which have included copper, bronze, pewter, sculpted steel, and argente. Hallmarks of his work include high relief, abstractly patterned surfaces, combining gilding, gnarled wood, and metal filigree. He also embraced and pioneered the integration of technology into design, including features such as remote-controlled doors and shelves in his creations.

American, 1931-1987, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, based in New Hope, Pennsylvania