Fire Salamander Vase
Fire Salamander Vase
Fire Salamander Vase
Fire Salamander Vase
Fire Salamander Vase
Fire Salamander Vase

Although this lovely vase does not bear his signature, it was undoubtedly modeled by Alphonse Voisin-Delacroix, who collaborated briefly with Dalpayrat in 1893 until his untimely death that year from pleurisy. After 1893, Dalpayrat re-cast many of
Voisin’s models without his initials. This vase appears to be such a casting. A finely modeled salamander crawls out of a fire’s dying embers, where according to legend, this amphibian could live. It is possible that the addition of salt or soda during the firing accounts for the mottled beadlike reduction glaze, which is sometimes referred to as a “tiger-skin” surface.
-Description by Claire Cass

Model illustrated in Makus, Horst, Adrien Dalpayrat, 1844-1910: französische Jugendstil-Keramik (Stuttgart: Arnoldsche, 1998), 138.

About Pierre Adrien Dalpayrat

Adrien Dalpayrat began his career as a faïence painter, working at six manufactories between 1867 and 1888 before settling near Paris in 1889. There he devoted himself to stoneware, a material then held in high esteem by French art potters. Working alone and with collaborators, Dalpayrat produced a vast range of shapes and decorations. He was so well known for his oxblood flambé pottery that the term "Dalpayrat red" was coined to designate his distinctive glaze. Perfected in 1892, it is dappled or veined with greens, blues and yellows, and appears on pieces in the form of gourds, fruits, and shapes derived from Japanese bottles. [Source: Jason Jacques]

French, 1844-1910

Solo Shows on Artsy

2016
Adrien Dalpayrat: Grand Feu, Jason Jacques Gallery, New York

Group Shows on Artsy

2014