Pierre Adrien Dalpayrat, ‘Panther Dominance’, 1896, Jason Jacques Gallery
Pierre Adrien Dalpayrat, ‘Panther Dominance’, 1896, Jason Jacques Gallery

In this work, first exhibited at Galerie Georges Petit in 1896, two wild cats hang off the edge of a cachepot bowl almost smaller than they are. Though they do not make physical contact, the two snarling creatures engage violently with one another, each curving their body around that of the other and dominating the piece with their palpable energy. The blue and purplish-red glaze covering the bowl bleeds onto their white figures, drawing them cohesively into the composition of the vessel. The Metropolitan Museum of Art owns a similar version of this piece, produced a year earlier.

About Pierre Adrien Dalpayrat

Adrien Dalpayrat began his career as a faïence painter, working at six manufactories between 1867 and 1888 before settling near Paris in 1889. There he devoted himself to stoneware, a material then held in high esteem by French art potters. Working alone and with collaborators, Dalpayrat produced a vast range of shapes and decorations. He was so well known for his oxblood flambé pottery that the term "Dalpayrat red" was coined to designate his distinctive glaze. Perfected in 1892, it is dappled or veined with greens, blues and yellows, and appears on pieces in the form of gourds, fruits, and shapes derived from Japanese bottles. [Source: Jason Jacques]

French, 1844-1910