Pieter Hugo, ‘Untitled’, 2014, Headlands Center for the Arts: Benefit Auction 2017

Please note: After bidding closes on Artsy, bids on this piece will be transferred and executed at the live auction component of the Headlands Center for the Arts benefit auction on the evening of June 7, 2017.

Born in Johannesburg, Pieter Hugo (Artist in Residence ’14) is a photographic artist living in Cape Town. Major museum solo exhibitions have taken place at The Hague Museum of Photography; Musée de l'Elysée, Lausanne; Ludwig Museum, Budapest; Fotografiska, Stockholm; MAXXI, Rome; and the Institute of Modern Art Brisbane, among others. Hugo has participated in numerous group exhibitions at institutions including Tate Modern; Museum Folkwang, Essen, Germany; Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian; and the São Paulo Biennale. Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg is currently presenting a survey exhibition spanning 13 years of Pieter Hugo's work, titled Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea. His work is represented in numerous public and private collections, among them the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Victoria and Albert Museum, London; SFMOMA; J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; and Huis Marseille, Amsterdam. Hugo received the Discovery Award at the Rencontres d'Arles Festival and the KLM Paul Huf Award in 2008. In 2015 he was shortlisted for the Prix Pictet and was chosen as the ‘In Focus’ artist for the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize at the National Portrait Gallery in London.

–Courtesy of Headlands Center for the Arts

Framing courtesy of The Painters Place

About Pieter Hugo

One of South Africa’s leading photographers, Pieter Hugo documents the people and landscapes of Africa. Hugo is interested in capturing images of the continent’s marginalized peoples, including the blind, albinos, and AIDS victims in their coffins. His best-known series, “The Hyena and Other Men” (2005-07), depicts itinerant minstrels in Nigeria who perform with pet hyenas and other wild animals. In his series “Permanent Error” (2009-10), Hugo captures the people and landscape of an expansive technology dump of obsolete technology in Ghana. Though he lists David Goldblatt and Boris Mikhailov as influences, Hugo’s work counters the thread of realism in South African photography the two represent. “I am of a generation that approaches photography with a keen awareness of the problems inherent in pointing a camera at anything,” he says.

South African, b. 1976, Cape Town, South Africa