Pol Bury, ‘Statue de la liberté’, 1991, Print, Color lithograph, PIASA
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Pol Bury

Statue de la liberté, 1991

Color lithograph
29 7/10 × 21 1/10 in
75.5 × 53.5 cm
Edition 24/70
Bidding closed
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About the work
P
PIASA

75.5 x 53.5 cm - Framed - Good condition, brown spots in the lower margin - Framed

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Medium
Signature
Dry stamp Atelier Clot, Paris Lithograph in colors, signed and numbered 24/70
Pol Bury
Belgian, 1922–2005
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Best known for his kinetic sculptures, Belgian artist Pol Bury began his career as a Surrealist painter heavily influenced by the work of René Magritte and Yves Tanguy. After turning to geometric abstraction and associating briefly with the CoBrA group, an avant-garde movement that espoused the complete freedom of color and form, Bury discovered Alexander Calder’s work and began making mobiles of painted shapes and sculptures in which movement was emphasized. The movements he assigned to these sometimes-monumental works were often slow and almost imperceptible to the naked eye. “Speed limits space; slowness increases it,” he once said. Over the course of his career, Bury created a number of fountains that incorporated water into their kinetic workings, including his well known L’Octagon (1985) in San Francisco.

Pol Bury, ‘Statue de la liberté’, 1991, Print, Color lithograph, PIASA
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
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About the work
P
PIASA

75.5 x 53.5 cm - Framed - Good condition, brown spots in the lower margin - Framed

Buyer responsible for Buyer’s Premium and any applicable taxes, including VAT.

Medium
Signature
Dry stamp Atelier Clot, Paris Lithograph in colors, signed and numbered 24/70
Pol Bury
Belgian, 1922–2005
Follow

Best known for his kinetic sculptures, Belgian artist Pol Bury began his career as a Surrealist painter heavily influenced by the work of René Magritte and Yves Tanguy. After turning to geometric abstraction and associating briefly with the CoBrA group, an avant-garde movement that espoused the complete freedom of color and form, Bury discovered Alexander Calder’s work and began making mobiles of painted shapes and sculptures in which movement was emphasized. The movements he assigned to these sometimes-monumental works were often slow and almost imperceptible to the naked eye. “Speed limits space; slowness increases it,” he once said. Over the course of his career, Bury created a number of fountains that incorporated water into their kinetic workings, including his well known L’Octagon (1985) in San Francisco.

Pol Bury

Statue de la liberté, 1991

Color lithograph
29 7/10 × 21 1/10 in
75.5 × 53.5 cm
Edition 24/70
Bidding closed
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
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