Poul Henningsen, ‘Ceiling lamp’, 1929, Modernity
Poul Henningsen, ‘Ceiling lamp’, 1929, Modernity
Poul Henningsen, ‘Ceiling lamp’, 1929, Modernity
Poul Henningsen, ‘Ceiling lamp’, 1929, Modernity
Poul Henningsen, ‘Ceiling lamp’, 1929, Modernity

Beyond the original PH Lamps, Poul Henningsen worked on the Septima between 1927 and 1931. Here again, he cloaked the bulb in several layers that simultaneously diffuse and reflect light to create a warm and harmonious ambiance. The commercial and cultural potential of the Septima was never fully realized, and very few examples were produced. On the eve of World War II, Louis Poulsen ceased production due to material shortages. And then, given Henningsen’s outspoken radical views, he and his wife moved to Sweden (along with fellow Danish designer Arne Jacobsen and his wife) to avoid the Nazis. Nevertheless, the Septima still had a significant impact. It’s believed that Henningsen revisited this design specifically in 1958, when he was commissioned to create large, opulent chandeliers for a venerable, waterfront restaurant in Copenhagen called the Langelinie Pavilion.

Signature: Stamped Pat. Appl.

Manufacturer: Louis Poulsen

Tina Jørstian and Poul Erik Munk Nielsen, eds., Light Years Ahead, The Story of the PH Lamp, Copenhagen, 1994, p. 181, 237-39 for images and a technical drawing.
Nyt Tidsskrift For Kunstindustri (Copenhagen), no. 1, January 1928, p. 203 Produced by Louis Poulsen.

About Poul Henningsen

Author, architect and critic Poul Henningsen contributed greatly to the cultural life of Denmark through his design and literary work. As a designer, his lamps were perhaps his most important contribution; the PH-lamp, his namesake product created in 1925, resembled an artichoke in appearance and applied the multiple layers to reflect and refract light among the varied surfaces. This relationship between light and structure, shadows, glare, and color were the foundation for the designer’s later work, including the PH Grand Piano, which is included in many 20th-century design collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Danish, 1894-1967, Copenhagen, Denmark