Quayola, ‘Pleasant Places #S006.004’, 2015, bitforms gallery
Quayola, ‘Pleasant Places #S006.004’, 2015, bitforms gallery

"Pleasant Places" (2015) derives its name from the first series of landscape prints produced in Holland in the seventeenth century. In direct dialogue with the work of Vincent Van Gogh, Quayola returned to the same countryside in Provence, 125 years later. Based on 3D-scanned natural scenery in southern France, the series consists of both hyper-realistic and highly interpretative computer-generated imagery. With high-resolution, laser-scanning technology and computer-simulations, "Pleasant Places" challenges the photographic image and proposes alternative modes of vision and synthesis: familiar landscapes are transformed into dense and impenetrable masses of geometries. The landscape serves as a point of departure, paying homage to the tradition of landscape painting in Western art, while also alluding to a pivotal moment within its history when representation began to verge on abstraction. The series includes both still and moving images.

About Quayola

Multimedia artist Quayola uses video, computer software, and installation to explore the tension between real and artificial spaces and surfaces. His works include animated hybrid paintings and sculptures, time-based digital sculptures, and immersive audiovisual installations. In digital paintings such as Topologies (2010), which examines the relationship between contemporary digital aesthetics and iconic works of art and architecture (and forms part of the artist’s “Strata” series), Quayola took paintings by Diego Velázquez and Giovanni Battista Tiepolo and transformed their surfaces into animated geometric forms. “As I work,” Quayola has said, “I start to become incredibly fascinated by the underlying shapes.”

Italian, b. 1982, Rome, Italy, based in London, United Kingdom