R. Buckminster Fuller, ‘Vector Equilibrium Jitterbug Duo’, 1980, Edward Cella Art and Architecture
R. Buckminster Fuller, ‘Vector Equilibrium Jitterbug Duo’, 1980, Edward Cella Art and Architecture
R. Buckminster Fuller, ‘Vector Equilibrium Jitterbug Duo’, 1980, Edward Cella Art and Architecture
R. Buckminster Fuller, ‘Vector Equilibrium Jitterbug Duo’, 1980, Edward Cella Art and Architecture
R. Buckminster Fuller, ‘Vector Equilibrium Jitterbug Duo’, 1980, Edward Cella Art and Architecture
R. Buckminster Fuller, ‘Vector Equilibrium Jitterbug Duo’, 1980, Edward Cella Art and Architecture

After 1947, one invention dominated Fuller's life and career: the geodesic dome. Based on Fuller's "synergetic geometry," his lifelong exploration of nature's principles of design, the geodesic dome was the result of his revolutionary discoveries about balancing compression and tension forces in building. Vector Equilibrium Jitterbug Duo, Edition 6 of 10, reflects Fuller’s exploration of these relationships through complex geometric forms. A vector equilibrium, named “jitterbug” by Buckminster, describes the circumstances by which the outward radial thrust of the vectors from the center of a form is balanced by the circumferentially restraining chordal vectors—in other words: the explosive forces perfectly balance the implosive forces.

Vector Equilibrium Jitterbug Duo allows the user to experience this relationship first-hand by subjecting the vector equilibrium to folding, compressing, expanding, rotating. The result is a translation of a phenomenon found in nature as filtered through the cleverness and ingenuity of a Buckminster Fuller invention. In his own words: "the vector equilibrium is a condition in which nature never allows herself to tarry. The vector equilibrium itself is never found exactly symmetrical in nature's crystallography. Ever pulsive and impulsive, nature never pauses her cycling at equilibrium : she refuses to get caught irrecoverably at the zero phase of energy. She always closes her transformative cycles at the maximum positive or negative asymmetry stages."

About R. Buckminster Fuller

Best known for popularizing the geodesic dome, R. Buckminster Fuller produced theories and contributions to science, architecture, and design that amounted to a sweeping and utopian vision for the future. Self-described as a “comprehensive, anticipatory design scientist,” Fuller sought to alter the landscape of daily life with his prefabricated homes and cutting-edge vehicles. “My objective was humanity’s comprehensive success in the universe,” he once said. His projects include the “Dymaxion” house and car, whose simplicity and adaptability to different landscapes were intended for mass production and efficient living, though neither was ever made widely available. The spirit of Fuller’s inventiveness remains influential to present-day entrepreneurs, artists, and inventors alike.

American, 1895-1983, Milton, Massachusetts, based in Los Angeles, California