Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, ‘1984x1984’, 2015, bitforms gallery
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1984x1984, 2015

Computer, Kinect, display
Editions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 of 6 + 1AP
This is part of a limited edition set.
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Location
New York , Los Angeles , San Francisco
About the work
Articles
bitforms gallery
New York , Los Angeles , +1 more

"1984x1984" is the tenth piece in Lozano-Hemmer’s "Shadow Box" series of …

Medium
Other
Series
Shadow Box 10
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer
Mexican, b. 1967
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Electronic artist Rafael Lozano-Hemmer's public art installations combine technology, architecture, and performance using devices like robotics, projections, and cell phones. He constructs "temporary anti-monuments for alien agency," as in Pulse Tank (2008), in which heart rate sensors send ripples across the surface of water, or the Guggenheim's 2009 installation Levels of Nothingness, which allowed people to speak into a computer that linked voice traits to colors that were projected across the room. His Vectorial Elevation (1999), in which 800,000 participants created searchlight sculptures above Mexico City, may well be the world's largest interactive artwork ever.

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Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, ‘1984x1984’, 2015, bitforms gallery
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About the work
Articles
bitforms gallery
New York , Los Angeles , +1 more

"1984x1984" is the tenth piece in Lozano-Hemmer’s "Shadow Box" series of interactive displays with a built-in computerized tracking system. The piece shows a grid of thousands of random numbers extracted from addresses photographed by Google Street View. Scanned by Google from the front doors of …

Medium
Other
Series
Shadow Box 10
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer
Mexican, b. 1967
Follow

Electronic artist Rafael Lozano-Hemmer's public art installations combine technology, architecture, and performance using devices like robotics, projections, and cell phones. He constructs "temporary anti-monuments for alien agency," as in Pulse Tank (2008), in which heart rate sensors send ripples across the surface of water, or the Guggenheim's 2009 installation Levels of Nothingness, which allowed people to speak into a computer that linked voice traits to colors that were projected across the room. His Vectorial Elevation (1999), in which 800,000 participants created searchlight sculptures above Mexico City, may well be the world's largest interactive artwork ever.

1984x1984, 2015

Computer, Kinect, display
Editions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 of 6 + 1AP
This is part of a limited edition set.
Sold
Location
New York , Los Angeles , San Francisco
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