Seismoscope 2: Abu Hamid Muhammad ibn Muhammad al-Ghazali., Persian (1058-1111), author of "The Incoherence of Philosophers"
Seismoscope 2: Abu Hamid Muhammad ibn Muhammad al-Ghazali., Persian (1058-1111), author of "The Incoherence of Philosophers"

The series "Seismoscopes" consists of devices that detect vibration around them, from footsteps to earthquakes, and record this vibration on paper using an automated XY-plotter. As each Seismoscope registers any seismic wave it is programmed to draw an illustration of a single Skeptical philosopher, over and over again. The first Seismoscope, for example, always draws the portrait of Portuguese philosopher Francisco Sanches, author of the seminal treatise "That Nothing is Known". The actual traces of the drawing follow a random path, although staying within the portrait image that has been burned into the memory of the device, --thus, every drawing is different. The artwork is the device itself not the drawings it makes: the collector or curator may give these drawings away, they may exhibit them as a pile on the floor or hang them neatly on the walls.

XY Plotter: 16.1"x17.7"x6.7" / 41x45x17cm
Podium: 45.2" x 16.1" x 17.7" / 115 x 41 x 45 cm
(contains all the computers and electronics to run the work)
Drawing: 11"x 17" / 28 x 43 cm.

"Recorders", Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, Australia, 2011 - 2012.

"Drawing in Relation", DNA Gallery, Berlin, Germany, 2011.

"Optimismo Radical", Josée Bienvenu Gallery, New York City, New York, United States, 2010.

ARCO '10, bitforms, Madrid, Spain, 2010 ('Seismoscopes 3' edition).

"Transition States", Haunch of Venison Gallery, New York City, New York, United States, 2009.

"Recent works", Galerie Guy Bärtschi, Geneva, Switzerland, 2009.

About Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

Electronic artist Rafael Lozano-Hemmer's public art installations combine technology, architecture, and performance using devices like robotics, projections, and cell phones. He constructs "temporary anti-monuments for alien agency," as in Pulse Tank (2008), in which heart rate sensors send ripples across the surface of water, or the Guggenheim's 2009 installation Levels of Nothingness, which allowed people to speak into a computer that linked voice traits to colors that were projected across the room. His Vectorial Elevation (1999), in which 800,000 participants created searchlight sculptures above Mexico City, may well be the world's largest interactive artwork ever.

Mexican, b. 1967, Mexico City, Mexico, based in Mexico City, Mexico

Exhibition Highlights On Artsy

2015
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Lapsus Lumen, bitforms gallery, New York
2015
E-Merge, Arsenal Montréal+Toronto, Montreal
2012
2008
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Pulse Park, Madison Square Park, New York

Solo Shows on Artsy

2015
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Lapsus Lumen, bitforms gallery, New York
2014
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Obra Sonora, Carroll / Fletcher, London
2012
2008
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Pulse Park, Madison Square Park, New York

Group Shows on Artsy

2015
Memory Burn, bitforms gallery, New York
2015
E-Merge, Arsenal Montréal+Toronto, Montreal
2014
Pencil / Line / Eraser, Carroll / Fletcher, London
View Artist's CV