Red Grooms, ‘Dali Salad II’, 1980, Phillips

Property from the Estate of Martin Lipton, Boca Raton

Signed and dated in pencil and numbered 47/55 on a metal plaque affixed to the reverse (there were also 12 artist's proofs), co-published by Brooke Alexander, Inc., New York and Marlborough Gallery, Inc., New York, framed.

From the Catalogue:
For this remarkably complex project, Grooms used fresh vegetables he purchased at a Minneapolis supermarket as the models for his salad ingredients, which were recreated as screenprints on vinyl. Painted ping pong balls were used for Dali's intense gaze.
Courtesy of Phillips

Walter Knestrick 85

About Red Grooms

Red Grooms’ “Ruckus Manhattan” in the mid-1970s humorously transformed Grand Central Terminal into a 3-D caricature of New York City. “I wanted to do a novelistic portrait of Manhattan from Battery Park to Grant’s tomb,” Grooms explained. The comic-book inspired interactive installation included iconic landmarks—the subway, Central Park, the Apollo Theater, the Woolworth building—populated by life-sized wooden figures of prostitutes, thieves, gamblers, tourists, shoppers, and families, revealing the city’s grit as well as its glamour. It was lauded for its effect of turning Manhattan—then threatening and oppressive—into a place of wonder. Since then, Grooms has “made a career of affectionate parody,” according one critic, through satirical, pop culture-infused prints and sculptural tableaux in homage to his adopted city.

American, b. 1937, Nashville, Tennessee, based in New York, New York