Red Grooms, ‘Unique  Ink Drawing (Provincetown) with personal inscription’, 1966, Alpha 137 Gallery
Red Grooms, ‘Unique  Ink Drawing (Provincetown) with personal inscription’, 1966, Alpha 137 Gallery
Red Grooms, ‘Unique  Ink Drawing (Provincetown) with personal inscription’, 1966, Alpha 137 Gallery
Red Grooms, ‘Unique  Ink Drawing (Provincetown) with personal inscription’, 1966, Alpha 137 Gallery
Red Grooms, ‘Unique  Ink Drawing (Provincetown) with personal inscription’, 1966, Alpha 137 Gallery
Red Grooms, ‘Unique  Ink Drawing (Provincetown) with personal inscription’, 1966, Alpha 137 Gallery

This unique early (1966) framed Red Gooms ink drawing on paper is signed and dated with a personal dedication "For Alice and Bo", PTown 66. Recently, the artist was asked who Alice and Bo were, and he said he forgot their last names, but they were good friends of his first wife, Mimi Gross. And, then -- serendipitously, we were informed by their daughter that Alice and Bo are Alice and Bo Bernstein, and the other lady is Mimi Gross's mom (!!)
Measurements:
Framed: 20 by 26 inches
Sheet: 16.5 x 13.25

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Signature: Signed, inscribed and dated with a dateline Provincetown on the front. According to Walter Knestrick (close friend of the artist and author of the Red Grooms catalogue raisonne, Alice and Bo were friends of Red's ex-wife Mimi Gross.)

About Red Grooms

Red Grooms’ “Ruckus Manhattan” in the mid-1970s humorously transformed Grand Central Terminal into a 3-D caricature of New York City. “I wanted to do a novelistic portrait of Manhattan from Battery Park to Grant’s tomb,” Grooms explained. The comic-book inspired interactive installation included iconic landmarks—the subway, Central Park, the Apollo Theater, the Woolworth building—populated by life-sized wooden figures of prostitutes, thieves, gamblers, tourists, shoppers, and families, revealing the city’s grit as well as its glamour. It was lauded for its effect of turning Manhattan—then threatening and oppressive—into a place of wonder. Since then, Grooms has “made a career of affectionate parody,” according one critic, through satirical, pop culture-infused prints and sculptural tableaux in homage to his adopted city.

American, b. 1937, Nashville, Tennessee, based in New York, New York