René Magritte, ‘Les Menottes de Cuivre’, Art Lithographies
René Magritte, ‘Les Menottes de Cuivre’, Art Lithographies
René Magritte, ‘Les Menottes de Cuivre’, Art Lithographies
René Magritte, ‘Les Menottes de Cuivre’, Art Lithographies
René Magritte, ‘Les Menottes de Cuivre’, Art Lithographies
René Magritte, ‘Les Menottes de Cuivre’, Art Lithographies
René Magritte, ‘Les Menottes de Cuivre’, Art Lithographies
René Magritte, ‘Les Menottes de Cuivre’, Art Lithographies

Patinated bronze sculpture of René Magritte, casted in France after the plaster cast reproduction of the Venus de Milo painted by René Magritte in 1931.

Inscribed with René Magritte's signature, Magritte Succession's hallmark, stamped by the foundry and with Mr. Charly Herscovici's (President of the Magritte Foundation & representing the Magritte Succession) casted thumbprint under the base.

Sold with a certificate of authenticity signed by Mr. Charly Herscovici.

Available in 3 different dimensions:

  • 50cm (19.68' in), edition of 250
  • 110cm (43.31' in), edition of 50
  • 220cm (86.61' in), edition of 8

Signature: Inscribed with René Magritte's signature, Magritte Succession's hallmark, stamped by the foundry and with Mr. Charly Herscovici's (President of the Magritte Foundation & representing the Magritte Succession) casted thumbprint under the base. Sold with a certificate of authenticity signed by Mr. Charly Herscovici.

According to Sylvester, Magritte painted the Venus de Milo four consecutive times (1931, 1934, and 1936) in an attempt to give her a new “unexpected life”.

The sculpture of 1931 was ordered by Louis Scutenaire and Irene Hamoir after having seen a similar one in Magritte’s workshop that was about to be handed to a collector, probably Claude Spaak. That of 1934, slightly bigger, figured in the London Gallery exhibition of 1937 as well as in 1938 (same place) for a personal exhibition. It would have belonged to Magritte himself, Mesens and Roland Penrose. It was still located in London in 1940 when destroyed due to bombings. Finally, that of 1936 was destined to be exhibited at Charles Ratton’s in the same year. "Magritte spoke of it in a letter dated 19 March 1936 to André Breton, who was, of course, closely involved in the organization of the show:

"This object is reminiscent of the masks on which I used to paint the sky, or a forest. Here, the head is white, the body is flesh-coloured, the drapery is blue, the base and the arms and feet are black. In my opinion this gives the Venus new and unexpected life."

Magritte, earlier in the letter, asked Breron to find a title for the Venus [...] Breton responded in a letter dated 8 April 1936:

"I resign myself to proposing a purely poetic title: the “Copper Handcuffs” which I believe has the advantage of incorporating a new color in the object yet without introducing the arbitrary as copper is the metal corresponding to the Venus."

The proposed title was adopted both for this work and for previous versions." (in D. Sylvester, ed., René Magritte, Catalogue raisonné: Oil Paintings, Objects and Bronzes 1931 -1948, New York, 1993, vol. ii, pp. 423, 426, 427, 447, no. 673, 677, 678).

The exhibition "Le Surréalisme et l'objet" held by the Centre Pompidou, Musée national d'Art Moderne in Paris from October 2013 to March 2014, hosts a 47 cm-high bronze sculpture of this edition, which also illustrates the "Dictionnaire de l'objet surréaliste", published under the direction of Didier Ottinger, curator of the exhibition.

About René Magritte

With his highly cerebral Surrealist imagery, René Magritte breathed new life into seemingly conventional subject matter. He often painted everyday objects out of context, in juxtapositions forcing the viewer to reconsider things normally taken for granted. In his iconic trompe l’oeil work The Treachery of Images (1928-29), for example, Magritte painted a hyperrealistic pipe and wrote, just beneath it, “this is not a pipe”—a caution not to trust our eyes and reminder that the art object, no matter how convincing, is not the real thing. Magritte’s highly figurative style of Surrealism is often discussed along the work of Salvador Dalí and Giorgio de Chirico, and his persistent interrogation of objects has both influenced and paved the way for seminal artistic movements, from Conceptualism to Pop art.

Belgian, 1898-1967, Lessines, Belgium, based in Brussels, Belgium