Richard Galloway, ‘Cephalomania Four Stages of Cruelty’, 2016, India Dickinson
Richard Galloway, ‘Cephalomania Four Stages of Cruelty’, 2016, India Dickinson
Richard Galloway, ‘Cephalomania Four Stages of Cruelty’, 2016, India Dickinson
Richard Galloway, ‘Cephalomania Four Stages of Cruelty’, 2016, India Dickinson
Richard Galloway, ‘Cephalomania Four Stages of Cruelty’, 2016, India Dickinson

Cephalomania Four Stages of Cruelty

“He draws you to him, and into himself, while bound down, glued to the ground, you feel yourself gradually emptied into his horrible pouch, which is the monster itself.”
My tale of the squid starts with the unlikely triumph of children winning at the fair ground.
A slippery glass vestibule is crammed with a devil fish and is carefully extracted by the skillful crane driver. Against the Sponge Bob Square Pants odds, the squid is born.
The octopus is now at home he has already out grown the container to which he was placed. Children play with the octopus. He sits calmly looking into the mirror so he can be groomed. Rollers are placed into his hair. Selfies are taken from the gantry bridge, darts are dropped from a height, and shower curtains are used to tether the symmetrical animal.
A sweater jumper is being knitted directly onto one of its limbs, bongos ring out as they use the pads to make music, a pair use cable clips to restrict the movement of the devil mollusk.
The television repair man ensures the TV is kept working at all times, an artist colours in the parts he can reach. The borderline play crosses over into cruelty. A similar cruelty to what english artist William Hogarth depicted in 1751 with his Four Stages of Cruelty over four engraved panels he shows the story of the Villain Tom Nero. Cruelty develops into barbarism into murder and a hanging.
The octopus grows stronger and is now tired of the children and their methods. Chaos ensues and the octopus wreaks havoc. The beer can is spilled and the scene begins to flood. The selfie bridge is destroyed. The children wear life jackets as they cry and comfort each other. Shower curtains are used to cover the dead. The Iron staircase erupts through the water surely to be reported as a danger of the sea. The TV is broken and the giant squid employs the blow torch
Action must be taken. The children re group and decide they must overcome the ambition of the now giant octopus. They hatch a plan to kill, chop up and eat the squid. Handsaws work hard and heavy lifting equipment is used to fill the squid soup bowl. The blow torch is now in the safe small hands of a child. The spilt beer begins to recede. Spikes plunge the soup to make more room. The revenge plot is not clear cut, as before they celebrate one boy is ferociously stomach sick from the soup, a tentacled limb mops his brow as comfort. Maybe for an old friend. The last laugh remains to be seen and revenge is not certain.

About Richard Galloway

British, b. 1980, Northamptonshire, UK, based in Sweden