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Oculist witnesses, 1968

Screenprint and silver mirror in laminated glass with aluminum plinth
25 1/2 × 20 × 8 in
64.8 × 50.8 × 20.3 cm
Bidding closed
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About the work
Bibliography
P
Phillips

Signed by both artists and numbered 39/50 in white paint (there were also 10 artist's proofs), …

Read more

Signed by both artists and numbered 39/50 in white paint (there were also 10 artist's proofs), published by Petersburg Press, London.

From the Catalogue:
The Arts Council of Great Britain asked Hamilton to organize a Duchamp retrospective at the Tate Gallery in 1966. The Almost Complete Works of Marcel Duchamp …

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Richard Hamilton
British, 1922–2011
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In his celebrated collages, Richard Hamilton explored the relationship between fine art, product design, and popular culture, setting the stage for Pop art. His most iconic work, Just What Is it that Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing? (1956)—a scene comprised of images cut from magazines ads, showing a semi-nude couple in their living space—was produced for the groundbreaking exhibition “This is Tomorrow,” organized by the Independent Group at the Whitechapel Art Gallery in London in 1956. Throughout his career, Hamilton continued to break down hierarchies of artistic value, making silkscreens of Mick Jagger’s drug arrest, producing studies of industrial design objects (like toasters), and designing the cover of the Beatles’ 1968 White Album.

Marcel Duchamp
French, 1887–1968
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Associated with the Dada, Surrealist, Cubist, and Futurist movements, Marcel Duchamp radically subverted conventional practices of artmaking and display, challenging such weighty notions as the hand of the artist and the sanctity of the art object. Duchamp’s depiction of dynamic Cubist forms in Nude Descending a Staircase No. 2 (1912) established him as a leading member of the international avant-garde. In 1913 Duchamp created Bicycle Wheel, which is considered the first of his famous readymades—minimally altered objects that are elevated to the status of art simply through the designation of the artist. Particularly in his readymades, Duchamp placed unprecedented emphasis on the artistic concept as paramount over craftsmanship or aesthetics, a guiding principle that has proved hugely influential to 20th-century artistic practice.

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share
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About the work
Bibliography
P
Phillips

Signed by both artists and numbered 39/50 in white paint (there were also 10 artist's proofs), …

Read more

Signed by both artists and numbered 39/50 in white paint (there were also 10 artist's proofs), published by Petersburg Press, London.

From the Catalogue:
The Arts Council of Great Britain asked Hamilton to organize a Duchamp retrospective at the Tate Gallery in 1966. The Almost Complete Works of Marcel Duchamp …

Read more
Richard Hamilton
British, 1922–2011
Follow

In his celebrated collages, Richard Hamilton explored the relationship between fine art, product design, and popular culture, setting the stage for Pop art. His most iconic work, Just What Is it that Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing? (1956)—a scene comprised of images cut from magazines ads, showing a semi-nude couple in their living space—was produced for the groundbreaking exhibition “This is Tomorrow,” organized by the Independent Group at the Whitechapel Art Gallery in London in 1956. Throughout his career, Hamilton continued to break down hierarchies of artistic value, making silkscreens of Mick Jagger’s drug arrest, producing studies of industrial design objects (like toasters), and designing the cover of the Beatles’ 1968 White Album.

Marcel Duchamp
French, 1887–1968
Follow

Associated with the Dada, Surrealist, Cubist, and Futurist movements, Marcel Duchamp radically subverted conventional practices of artmaking and display, challenging such weighty notions as the hand of the artist and the sanctity of the art object. Duchamp’s depiction of dynamic Cubist forms in Nude Descending a Staircase No. 2 (1912) established him as a leading member of the international avant-garde. In 1913 Duchamp created Bicycle Wheel, which is considered the first of his famous readymades—minimally altered objects that are elevated to the status of art simply through the designation of the artist. Particularly in his readymades, Duchamp placed unprecedented emphasis on the artistic concept as paramount over craftsmanship or aesthetics, a guiding principle that has proved hugely influential to 20th-century artistic practice.

Oculist witnesses, 1968

Screenprint and silver mirror in laminated glass with aluminum plinth
25 1/2 × 20 × 8 in
64.8 × 50.8 × 20.3 cm
Bidding closed
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
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