Richard Hamilton, ‘Seminar (with Dieter Roth)’, 1971, Print, Offset lithograph in colours, on Hodgkinson handmade paper, the full sheet., Phillips
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share

Seminar (with Dieter Roth), 1971

Offset lithograph in colours, on Hodgkinson handmade paper, the full sheet.
28 7/10 × 40 1/5 in
73 × 102 cm
Bidding closed
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
P
Phillips

Property Subject to Artist's Resale Right (see Conditions of Sale for further information)

Medium
Richard Hamilton
British, 1922–2011
Follow

In his celebrated collages, Richard Hamilton explored the relationship between fine art, product design, and popular culture, setting the stage for Pop art. His most iconic work, Just What Is it that Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing? (1956)—a scene comprised of images cut from magazines ads, showing a semi-nude couple in their living space—was produced for the groundbreaking exhibition “This is Tomorrow,” organized by the Independent Group at the Whitechapel Art Gallery in London in 1956. Throughout his career, Hamilton continued to break down hierarchies of artistic value, making silkscreens of Mick Jagger’s drug arrest, producing studies of industrial design objects (like toasters), and designing the cover of the Beatles’ 1968 White Album.

Dieter Roth
Swiss, 1930–1998
Follow

Considered one of the most influential European artists of the post-war period, Dieter Roth produced artworks in a great range of media, from artist’s books, graphics, drawings, and sculptures, to assemblages and installations including sound, music, and video. In 1954 Roth started to make experimental works, including his first baked sculpture (a spiral made from bread dough), forays into Op art, and kinetic sculptures. In the ’60s he made pictures and objects that incorporated chocolate and other edible materials subject to decomposition—meditations on time, decay, and metamorphosis. Critics often note that there was little to separate Roth’s life from his work; his artwork, Fussboden (Floor, 1975–92), for example, was comprised of a wooden studio floor covered with pigment and glue. To create the work, Roth removed the floor from his studio in Iceland and hung it like a painting, allowing it to function as a readymade record of his practice.

Richard Hamilton, ‘Seminar (with Dieter Roth)’, 1971, Print, Offset lithograph in colours, on Hodgkinson handmade paper, the full sheet., Phillips
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share
P
Phillips

Property Subject to Artist's Resale Right (see Conditions of Sale for further information)

Signed by both artists, dated and numbered 88/96 in pencil (there were also 10 artist's proofs), co-published by Professional Prints A.G., Zug, and Petersburg Press, S.A., framed.

Medium
Richard Hamilton
British, 1922–2011
Follow

In his celebrated collages, Richard Hamilton explored the relationship between fine art, product design, and popular culture, setting the stage for Pop art. His most iconic work, Just What Is it that Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing? (1956)—a scene comprised of images cut from magazines ads, showing a semi-nude couple in their living space—was produced for the groundbreaking exhibition “This is Tomorrow,” organized by the Independent Group at the Whitechapel Art Gallery in London in 1956. Throughout his career, Hamilton continued to break down hierarchies of artistic value, making silkscreens of Mick Jagger’s drug arrest, producing studies of industrial design objects (like toasters), and designing the cover of the Beatles’ 1968 White Album.

Dieter Roth
Swiss, 1930–1998
Follow

Considered one of the most influential European artists of the post-war period, Dieter Roth produced artworks in a great range of media, from artist’s books, graphics, drawings, and sculptures, to assemblages and installations including sound, music, and video. In 1954 Roth started to make experimental works, including his first baked sculpture (a spiral made from bread dough), forays into Op art, and kinetic sculptures. In the ’60s he made pictures and objects that incorporated chocolate and other edible materials subject to decomposition—meditations on time, decay, and metamorphosis. Critics often note that there was little to separate Roth’s life from his work; his artwork, Fussboden (Floor, 1975–92), for example, was comprised of a wooden studio floor covered with pigment and glue. To create the work, Roth removed the floor from his studio in Iceland and hung it like a painting, allowing it to function as a readymade record of his practice.

Seminar (with Dieter Roth), 1971

Offset lithograph in colours, on Hodgkinson handmade paper, the full sheet.
28 7/10 × 40 1/5 in
73 × 102 cm
Bidding closed
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
Other works by Richard Hamilton
Related works
Get the Artsy iOS app
Discover, buy, and sell art by the world’s leading artists
To download, scan this code with your phone’s camera