Robert Bechtle, ‘FACADE (Exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Art)’, 1954, Alpha 137 Gallery
Robert Bechtle, ‘FACADE (Exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Art)’, 1954, Alpha 137 Gallery

This is an extremely rare early work from the mid 1950s by renowned American photo realist artist Robert Bechtle. Although the lithograph is not numbered, it was created in an edition of only five. Early prints like this one by Bechtle are extremely elusive and hard to come by; all this more so as this one has such distinguished provenance, as it was exhibited at SFMOMA in the mid 1950s. This very work was exhibited at the San Francisco Art Association 18th Annual Drawing and Print Exhibition as well as the San Francisco Museum of Art, July 8 - August 1, 1954. A rare find!
Unframed.

Signature: Signed and dated '54 lower right in pencil; ( from an edition of 5)

This very work was exhibited at the San Francisco Art Association 18th Annual Drawing and Print Exhibition as well as the San Francisco Museum of Art, July 8 - August 1, 1954

About Robert Bechtle

Robert Bechtle paints what he calls portraits of the “essence of American experience.” Bechtle’s subjects come from his surroundings and scenes he knows with great familiarity: families, residential neighborhoods in California, and especially cars—an object he has extreme reverence for. Since the 1960s, Bechtle has been an active affiliate of the Bay Area Figurative Art movement, which ran counter to both Pop Art and Abstract Expressionism on the East Coast. His controlled paint handling and attention to detail have established Bechtle as one of the eminent Photorealists of his time. Bechtle explains his disciplinary choice in stating that he is trying “to achieve a kind of neutrality or transparency, in the sense that I would like the viewer to react first to the thing pictured…and only secondly to how it is painted.”

American, b. 1932, San Francisco, California, based in San Francisco, California

Exhibition Highlights

2016
New York,
Shrines to Speed Art And The Automobile: From The Minimal To The Postmodern