M
MOCA
Los Angeles

The Ralph M. Parsons Foundation Photography Collection

Medium
Image rights
© Robert Frank, from The Americans

One of the most acclaimed photographers of the 20th century, Robert Frank is best known for his seminal book The Americans, featuring photographs taken by the artist in the mid-1950s as he traveled across the U.S. on a Guggenheim fellowship. These photographs feature glimpses of highways, cars, parades, jukeboxes, and diners as iconic symbols of America while simultaneously suggesting an underlying sense of alienation and hardship. Frank’s loose, casual approach often generated blurred imagery and tilted horizons, causing his photographic style to be as controversial as his subject matter. In the 1950s, Frank was a regular contributor to Harper’s Bazaar, but later turned his focus from still images to filmmaking, creating classics of American subculture such as Pull My Daisy (1959).

High auction record
$663.8k, Christie's, 2013
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
Selected exhibitions
2021
For the Record: Documentary Photographs from the Etherton Gallery Archive & Danny Lyon: Thirty Photographs, 1962-1980Etherton Gallery
2019
The World According toPace Gallery
2017
The ImmigrantsHoward Greenberg Gallery
View all

Parade - Hoboken, New Jersey, 1955

Gelatin silver print
11 × 13 7/8 in
27.9 × 35.2 cm
Location
Los Angeles
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M
MOCA
Los Angeles

The Ralph M. Parsons Foundation Photography Collection

Medium
Image rights
© Robert Frank, from The Americans

One of the most acclaimed photographers of the 20th century, Robert Frank is best known for his seminal book The Americans, featuring photographs taken by the artist in the mid-1950s as he traveled across the U.S. on a Guggenheim fellowship. These photographs feature glimpses of highways, cars, parades, jukeboxes, and diners as iconic symbols of America while simultaneously suggesting an underlying sense of alienation and hardship. Frank’s loose, casual approach often generated blurred imagery and tilted horizons, causing his photographic style to be as controversial as his subject matter. In the 1950s, Frank was a regular contributor to Harper’s Bazaar, but later turned his focus from still images to filmmaking, creating classics of American subculture such as Pull My Daisy (1959).

High auction record
$663.8k, Christie's, 2013
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
Selected exhibitions (3)

Series by this artist

Other works by Robert Frank
Other works from MOCA
Related works
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