Robert Heinecken, ‘'Just Good Eats For U Diner (Documentary Photograms by Robert F. Heinecken)'’, 1971, Sotheby's
Robert Heinecken, ‘'Just Good Eats For U Diner (Documentary Photograms by Robert F. Heinecken)'’, 1971, Sotheby's
Robert Heinecken, ‘'Just Good Eats For U Diner (Documentary Photograms by Robert F. Heinecken)'’, 1971, Sotheby's
Robert Heinecken, ‘'Just Good Eats For U Diner (Documentary Photograms by Robert F. Heinecken)'’, 1971, Sotheby's
Robert Heinecken, ‘'Just Good Eats For U Diner (Documentary Photograms by Robert F. Heinecken)'’, 1971, Sotheby's
Robert Heinecken, ‘'Just Good Eats For U Diner (Documentary Photograms by Robert F. Heinecken)'’, 1971, Sotheby's
Robert Heinecken, ‘'Just Good Eats For U Diner (Documentary Photograms by Robert F. Heinecken)'’, 1971, Sotheby's
Robert Heinecken, ‘'Just Good Eats For U Diner (Documentary Photograms by Robert F. Heinecken)'’, 1971, Sotheby's

Letterpress title/plate list/colophon simulating a menu, signed, dated 'Los Angeles Nov 71, and editioned '24/100' in pencil, and with a clear plastic menu folder with reproduction of a painting inserted, (Robert Heinecken, Photographist, pl. 11; Robert Heinecken, pl. 53) (11).

Each lithograph 10 by 8 in. (25.4 by 20.3 cm.)
The plastic menu folder 13 1/4 by 11 1/2 in (33.7 by 29.2 cm.)

From the Catalogue:
The work represents five typical feeding times of the American middle class: Breakfast, Coffee Break, Lunch, Cocktails and Dinner were selected as the U S of A table d' hote. The original skiagraphic images were made by exposing actual foods/meals to light sensitive materials, which were then transferred to aluminum plates. . . They consist of various food/meal combinations resulting from an exploration of the aleatory nature of the printing phase. Each of the portfolios in the edition of 100 were made from the same initial set of pictures but no two prints are identical and no two portfolios contain exactly the same prints.' -Robert Heinecken
—Courtesy of Sotheby's

Acquired from the artist

About Robert Heinecken

Over five decades, Robert Heinecken's work as an artist and teacher radically expanded the reach of photography. A precursor to appropriation artists of the 1980s, Heinecken is known for series like the influential "Are You Rea" (1966-67), in which he used magazine pages placed on light tables to create unexpected juxtapositions of advertising and feature photography. Deemed a "para-photographer" for his unconventional processes and irreverent attitude, Heinecken typically worked from found images, transforming them through methods like lithography, etching, and direct-exposure photograms.

American, 1931-2006, Denver, Colorado, based in Los Angeles, California