Robert Indiana, ‘Lewiston’, 1991, Alpha 137: Prints and Exhibition Ephemera
Robert Indiana, ‘Lewiston’, 1991, Alpha 137: Prints and Exhibition Ephemera
Robert Indiana, ‘Lewiston’, 1991, Alpha 137: Prints and Exhibition Ephemera
Robert Indiana, ‘Lewiston’, 1991, Alpha 137: Prints and Exhibition Ephemera
Robert Indiana, ‘Lewiston’, 1991, Alpha 137: Prints and Exhibition Ephemera
Robert Indiana, ‘Lewiston’, 1991, Alpha 137: Prints and Exhibition Ephemera

Unframed.

Accompanied by original packaging from Granada Editions; publisher.

This large (almost 43" high) commanding color silkscreen on white wove paper is based on a series of works Pop Art legend Robert Indiana created as a tribute to Marsden Hartley. The dates are the birth and death of Hartley. Robert Indiana learned that this former grocery store was adjacent to the house that Marsden Hartley lived in during the summer of 1938. This coincidence brings the idea of an homage to Maine’s most famous native artist. The image was inspired by Hartley's boldly abstract War Motif paintings between 1914 and 1915.

The edition is 150, and features a blindstamp in the lower left with "edition of 150" embossed in a circle. For this print, Indiana uses one of Hartley's most abstract and dynamic "Berlin Series" works. Painting No. 5 (Berlin 1914-1915), in the collection of the Whitney Museum of American Art, displays Hartley's profound feelings about the ensuing conflict of World War I and his fascination with the frenzy surrounding him. While symbols representing Von Freyburg, such as the chessboard, iron cross, and arabesque- like epaulet pattern remain prominent, the structural elements of the work hold equal significance. In very good condition; unframed.
--Courtesy of Alpha 137 Gallery

Signature: Signed and dated in pencil on the recto (front); with artists's printed name and personal copyright; stamped from the edition of 150; with publisher's blindstamp (on recto)

Publisher: Brand X and Granada Editions

About Robert Indiana

One of the central figures of the Pop Art movement, Robert Indiana takes his inspiration from commercial signs, claiming: “There are more signs than trees in America. There are more signs than leaves. So I think of myself as a painter of American landscape.” In his paintings, sculptures, and prints, he mimics and re-arranges the words and numbers of a myriad of signs, including the Phillips 66 gas station logo and the “Yield” traffic sign. He is most famous for his “Love” paintings and sculptures, first produced in the 1960s. Creating a block out of the word—with the “L” and the “O” set atop the “V” and the “E”—Indiana has effectively inserted his own sign into the mix. His “LOVE” painting was reproduced on a postage stamp in 1973; his “LOVE” sculptures are installed in public spaces worldwide.

American, b. 1928, New Castle, Indiana, based in New York, New York