Robert Indiana, ‘The Beware-Danger American Dream #4’, 1997, ArtWise

Limited Edition Serigraph published by Marco Fine Arts Contemporary Atelier and released as part of the large portfolio and book entitled "The American Dream". The fourth in the "American Dream" series, Indiana sought to convey a sense of danger with the color scheme, taking a nod from the "Danger" signs that were common at the time on America's highways. Indiana also saw the number 4 as intrinsically dangerous, as on the scale on a man's life numbered 1 to 10, 4 for him symbolized adolescence, the time he personally saw as the most dangerous in a person's life. Utilizing the words he had used to criticize the "American Dream" in his previous works in the series, Indiana also sought to reference the Nazi swastika in both its design and color scheme, so as to enhance the dangerous side of the American Dream even more.

About Robert Indiana

One of the central figures of the Pop Art movement, Robert Indiana takes his inspiration from commercial signs, claiming: “There are more signs than trees in America. There are more signs than leaves. So I think of myself as a painter of American landscape.” In his paintings, sculptures, and prints, he mimics and re-arranges the words and numbers of a myriad of signs, including the Phillips 66 gas station logo and the “Yield” traffic sign. He is most famous for his “Love” paintings and sculptures, first produced in the 1960s. Creating a block out of the word—with the “L” and the “O” set atop the “V” and the “E”—Indiana has effectively inserted his own sign into the mix. His “LOVE” painting was reproduced on a postage stamp in 1973; his “LOVE” sculptures are installed in public spaces worldwide.

American, b. 1928, New Castle, Indiana, based in New York, New York