Robert Natkin, ‘Untitled Abstract Expressionist Monoprint (signed twice; inscribed to Dorothy and Arthur with text and heart)’, ca. 1979, Alpha 137 Gallery
Robert Natkin, ‘Untitled Abstract Expressionist Monoprint (signed twice; inscribed to Dorothy and Arthur with text and heart)’, ca. 1979, Alpha 137 Gallery
Robert Natkin, ‘Untitled Abstract Expressionist Monoprint (signed twice; inscribed to Dorothy and Arthur with text and heart)’, ca. 1979, Alpha 137 Gallery
Robert Natkin, ‘Untitled Abstract Expressionist Monoprint (signed twice; inscribed to Dorothy and Arthur with text and heart)’, ca. 1979, Alpha 137 Gallery

This beautiful print is signed three times; once on the matrix of the print itself (plate), and twice by hand on the white front margin. It bears a beautiful inscription to Dorothy and Arthur, signed by "Bob", with a little heart doodle, and then it is signed fully in ink "Natkin" in the lower front margin. Although the work is undated, it appears to be from the late 1970s, based on the frame as well as the print style. It is held in its original wooden vintage frame, floated against matting with beveled white edges.
Measurements:
Framed: 23 inches by 34 inches
Sheet: 17 inches by 26.5

Signature: Signed three times; once on the matrix of the print itself (plate), and twice by hand on the white front bottom margin. It bears a beautiful inscription "to Dorothy and Arthur with my love", signed "Bob", with a little heart doodle, and then it is signed fully in ink "Natkin" further right in the lower front margin.

About Robert Natkin

Painter Robert Natkin was known for his lyrical abstract forms, applied in vivid, Post-Impressionist-inspired colors. He used both a paintbrush and palette knife to apply his bright acrylic paints to his canvas, sometimes also using cloths or netting as stencils. Though he made a number of series based on popular culture, like Hitchcock’s films and jazz, he declined to think of his work as deliberately narrative. “I sew together fragments of cloth unaware of the dress I’m sewing, unaware of its final look and function,” he once said. On occasion, his subjects were figural; a late series featured abstract heads and busts. Natkin was also famously mischievous. Among his other antics, his daughter recounted an instance in which Natkin licked a Vermeer painting at the Frick Collection when no one was looking.

American, 1930-2010, Chicago, Illinois