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8-contemporaries signed this copy at the 1993 Gemini Publication Release Party:
• Jonathan Borofsky
• Sidney B.Felsen (Founder Gemini G.E.L.)
• Ellsworth Kelly
• Roy Lichtenstein
• Malcolm Morley
• Claes Oldenburg
• Robert Rauschenberg
• Mark Rosenthal (Curator Guggenheim Museum)

Publisher: Gemini G.E.L.
Provenance: Private …

Medium
Condition
MINT
Signature
Hand-signed by artist
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included

Robert Rauschenberg’s enthusiasm for popular culture and, with his contemporary Jasper Johns, his rejection of the angst and seriousness of the Abstract Expressionists led him to search for a new way of painting. A prolific innovator of techniques and mediums, he used unconventional art materials ranging from dirt and house paint to umbrellas and car tires. In the early 1950s, Rauschenberg was already gaining a reputation as the art world’s enfant terrible with works such as Erased de Kooning Drawing (1953), for which he requested a drawing (as well as permission) from Willem de Kooning, and proceeded to rub away the image until only ghostly marks remained on the paper. By 1954, Rauschenberg completed his first three-dimensional collage paintings—he called them Combines—in which he incorporated discarded materials and mundane objects to explore the intersection of art and life. “I think a picture is more like the real world when it’s made out of the real world,” he said. In 1964 he became the first American to win the International Grand Prize in Painting at the Venice Biennale. The 1/4 Mile or Two Furlong Piece (1981–98), a cumulative artwork, embodies his spirit of eclecticism, comprising a retrospective overview of his many discrete periods, including painting, fabric collage, sculptural components made from cardboard and scrap metal, as well as a variety of image transfer and printing methods.

High auction record
$88.8m, Christie's, 2019
Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
Selected exhibitions
2018
Rauschenberg: In and About L.A.Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Rauschenberg: The 1/4 MileLos Angeles County Museum of Art
2017
Faurschou Foundation VeniceFaurschou Foundation
View all

Since the beginning of his career, Ellsworth Kelly's emphasis on pure form and color and his impulse to suppress gesture in favor of creating spatial unity have played a pivotal role in the development of abstract art in America. A major influence on Pop Art, Minimalism, hard-edge and color field painting, Ellsworth Kelly’s best-known works are distinguished by sharply delineated shapes flatly painted in vivid color, such as Colors for a Large Wall (1951). His abstract paintings are inspired by the interplay of light, space, and color in the architecture around him. In contrast, Kelly’s automatic drawings feature delicate outlines of bodies and flora.

High auction record
$9.8m, Christie's, 2019
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, Anderson Collection at Stanford University
Selected exhibitions
2019
Ellsworth Kelly : work on paperCahiers d'Art
2014
Ellsworth Kelly: Selected WorksGemini G.E.L. at Joni Moisant Weyl
2012
Ellsworth KellyCahiers d'Art
View all

When American Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein painted Look Mickey in 1961, it set the tone for his career. This primary-color portrait of the cartoon mouse introduced Lichtenstein’s detached and deadpan style at a time when introspective Abstract Expressionism reigned. Mining material from advertisements, comics, and the everyday, Lichtenstein brought what was then a great taboo—commercial art—into the gallery. He stressed the artificiality of his images by painting them as though they’d come from a commercial press, with the flat, single-color Ben-Day dots of the newspaper meticulously rendered by hand using paint and stencils. Later in his career, Lichtenstein extended his source material to art history, including the work of Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso, and experimented with three-dimensional works. Lichtenstein’s use of appropriated imagery has influenced artists such as Richard Prince, Jeff Koons, and Raymond Pettibon.

High auction record
$95.4m, Christie's, 2015
Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) , Lincoln Center Editions
Selected exhibitions
2021
Vera List and The Posters of Lincoln CenterLincoln Center Editions
2016
Roy Lichtenstein: Re-FigureCastelli Gallery
2012
Roy Lichtenstein: Landscapes in the Chinese StyleGagosian
View all
Sidney Felsen

British artist Malcolm Morley is best known for his hyperreal paintings and sculptures that pull subject matter from Old Masters, family portraits, current events, travel brochures, and other visual detritus. Using a grid system to transfer the images onto canvas—reminiscent of the Minimalist grid—he also transfers the borders, tears, and folds in order to foreground the objecthood of the image. Of his attempt to move beyond the strictures of photorealism, Morley says, “I make a handmade painting from a readymade.” Dissatisfied with merely reproducing the image, he draws from the vivid colors of Pop Art and collage techniques to further draw attention to the image as an object.

Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Lincoln Center Vera List Art Project
Selected exhibitions
2018
Lincoln Center Editions 2018Lincoln Center Editions
Malcolm Morley: Tally-hoSperone Westwater
2016
Malcolm Morley — History PaintingXavier Hufkens
View all

“I am for an art that is political-erotical-mystical, that does something more than sit on its ass in a museum,” wrote Claes Oldenburg in his seminal 1961 manifesto I Am For An Art. From his Happenings beginning in the 1960s, to his enormous public sculptures of ice cream and rubber stamps, to his collaboration with his wife Coosje van Bruggen, Oldenburg has remained at the forefront of the Conceptual and Pop art movements. He has worked in a variety of mediums including performance, drawing, and writing, though he is best known for his large glossy or soft sculptures of ordinary consumer items, such as Lipstick (Ascending) on Caterpillar Tracks (1969-74). Some of Oldenburg’s most radical works remain in the realm of concept, as in his proposal for Thames Ball (1967)—a giant toilet tank ball that would have floated on the Thames River. “I am for an art that grows up not knowing it is art at all,” he wrote. “I am for an artist who vanishes.”

High auction record
$3.6m, Christie's, 2015
Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
Selected exhibitions
2019
Claes Oldenburg: A Survey of Print and Sculpture EditionsGemini G.E.L. at Joni Moisant Weyl
2018
Claes Oldenburg at Gemini G.E.L. - Selected WorksGemini G.E.L.
2016
Los Angeles to New York: The Dwan Gallery, 1959-1971National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
View all

A sculptor, painter, and draughtsman, Jonathan Borofsky has explored in his work subjects as varied as dreams, labor, and the boundaries between life and art. At the core of his practice is his ongoing seres, “Counting” (1969–), a serial project comprised of a stack of graph paper sheets on which the artist writes consecutive numbers (1 to well over 3,000,000 today) in pencil and ink. Intending to count from one to infinity, Borofsky initially counted for hours every day. However, Borofsky is even better known for his “Hammering Man”, who appears in both two- and three-dimensional works and exists as monumental public sculptures all over the world, most notably in Seoul, Frankfurt, and Seattle. The steel sculptures include a motorized arm that hammers silently four times per minute through daylight hours, except on Labor Day, when the figure remains still. “At its heart, society reveres the worker. The Hammering Man is the worker in all of us,” Borofsky has said of the piece.

Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2019
1967-1980: ExplorationsPaula Cooper Gallery
Local: Gemini G.E.L. Collaborations with Los Angeles ArtistsGemini G.E.L.
Messin AroundGemini G.E.L. at Joni Moisant Weyl
View all
Sidney Felsen

"25 Years Studio", 1993, SIGNED by the BIG-8 Contemporary Artists, Gemini G.E.L., 1993

Lithograph, ink on paper
14 × 10 in
35.6 × 25.4 cm
.
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Certificate
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8-contemporaries signed this copy at the 1993 Gemini Publication Release Party:
• Jonathan Borofsky
• …

Medium
Condition
MINT
Signature
Hand-signed by artist
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included

Robert Rauschenberg’s enthusiasm for popular culture and, with his contemporary Jasper Johns, his rejection of the angst and seriousness of the Abstract Expressionists led him to search for a new way of painting. A prolific innovator of techniques and mediums, he used unconventional art materials ranging from dirt and house paint to umbrellas and car tires. In the early 1950s, Rauschenberg was already gaining a reputation as the art world’s enfant terrible with works such as Erased de Kooning Drawing (1953), for which he requested a drawing (as well as permission) from Willem de Kooning, and proceeded to rub away the image until only ghostly marks remained on the paper. By 1954, Rauschenberg completed his first three-dimensional collage paintings—he called them Combines—in which he incorporated discarded materials and mundane objects to explore the intersection of art and life. “I think a picture is more like the real world when it’s made out of the real world,” he said. In 1964 he became the first American to win the International Grand Prize in Painting at the Venice Biennale. The 1/4 Mile or Two Furlong Piece (1981–98), a cumulative artwork, embodies his spirit of eclecticism, comprising a retrospective overview of his many discrete periods, including painting, fabric collage, sculptural components made from cardboard and scrap metal, as well as a variety of image transfer and printing methods.

High auction record
$88.8m, Christie's, 2019
Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

Since the beginning of his career, Ellsworth Kelly's emphasis on pure form and color and his impulse to suppress gesture in favor of creating spatial unity have played a pivotal role in the development of abstract art in America. A major influence on Pop Art, Minimalism, hard-edge and color field painting, Ellsworth Kelly’s best-known works are distinguished by sharply delineated shapes flatly painted in vivid color, such as Colors for a Large Wall (1951). His abstract paintings are inspired by the interplay of light, space, and color in the architecture around him. In contrast, Kelly’s automatic drawings feature delicate outlines of bodies and flora.

High auction record
$9.8m, Christie's, 2019
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, Anderson Collection at Stanford University
Selected exhibitions (3)

When American Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein painted Look Mickey in 1961, it set the tone for his career. This primary-color portrait of the cartoon mouse introduced Lichtenstein’s detached and deadpan style at a time when introspective Abstract Expressionism reigned. Mining material from advertisements, comics, and the everyday, Lichtenstein brought what was then a great taboo—commercial art—into the gallery. He stressed the artificiality of his images by painting them as though they’d come from a commercial press, with the flat, single-color Ben-Day dots of the newspaper meticulously rendered by hand using paint and stencils. Later in his career, Lichtenstein extended his source material to art history, including the work of Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso, and experimented with three-dimensional works. Lichtenstein’s use of appropriated imagery has influenced artists such as Richard Prince, Jeff Koons, and Raymond Pettibon.

High auction record
$95.4m, Christie's, 2015
Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) , Lincoln Center Editions
Selected exhibitions (3)
Sidney Felsen

British artist Malcolm Morley is best known for his hyperreal paintings and sculptures that pull subject matter from Old Masters, family portraits, current events, travel brochures, and other visual detritus. Using a grid system to transfer the images onto canvas—reminiscent of the Minimalist grid—he also transfers the borders, tears, and folds in order to foreground the objecthood of the image. Of his attempt to move beyond the strictures of photorealism, Morley says, “I make a handmade painting from a readymade.” Dissatisfied with merely reproducing the image, he draws from the vivid colors of Pop Art and collage techniques to further draw attention to the image as an object.

Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Lincoln Center Vera List Art Project
Selected exhibitions (3)

“I am for an art that is political-erotical-mystical, that does something more than sit on its ass in a museum,” wrote Claes Oldenburg in his seminal 1961 manifesto I Am For An Art. From his Happenings beginning in the 1960s, to his enormous public sculptures of ice cream and rubber stamps, to his collaboration with his wife Coosje van Bruggen, Oldenburg has remained at the forefront of the Conceptual and Pop art movements. He has worked in a variety of mediums including performance, drawing, and writing, though he is best known for his large glossy or soft sculptures of ordinary consumer items, such as Lipstick (Ascending) on Caterpillar Tracks (1969-74). Some of Oldenburg’s most radical works remain in the realm of concept, as in his proposal for Thames Ball (1967)—a giant toilet tank ball that would have floated on the Thames River. “I am for an art that grows up not knowing it is art at all,” he wrote. “I am for an artist who vanishes.”

High auction record
$3.6m, Christie's, 2015
Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
Selected exhibitions (3)

A sculptor, painter, and draughtsman, Jonathan Borofsky has explored in his work subjects as varied as dreams, labor, and the boundaries between life and art. At the core of his practice is his ongoing seres, “Counting” (1969–), a serial project comprised of a stack of graph paper sheets on which the artist writes consecutive numbers (1 to well over 3,000,000 today) in pencil and ink. Intending to count from one to infinity, Borofsky initially counted for hours every day. However, Borofsky is even better known for his “Hammering Man”, who appears in both two- and three-dimensional works and exists as monumental public sculptures all over the world, most notably in Seoul, Frankfurt, and Seattle. The steel sculptures include a motorized arm that hammers silently four times per minute through daylight hours, except on Labor Day, when the figure remains still. “At its heart, society reveres the worker. The Hammering Man is the worker in all of us,” Borofsky has said of the piece.

Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

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