R. Buckminster Fuller, ‘"Buckminister Fuller", 1975,  Autograph on 'NOTES', Periodical of the School of Architecture and Environmental Design, Lecture at/from State University of New York,’, 1975, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
R. Buckminster Fuller, ‘"Buckminister Fuller", 1975,  Autograph on 'NOTES', Periodical of the School of Architecture and Environmental Design, Lecture at/from State University of New York,’, 1975, VINCE fine arts/ephemera

Buckminister Fuller Autograph on 'NOTES', Periodical of the School of Architecture and Environmental Design, February 1975, Lecture at/from State University of New York, SUNY Buffalo, NY.

Signature: Signed

SUNY Buffalo, NY
Hemphill Collection, NY

About R. Buckminster Fuller

Best known for popularizing the geodesic dome, R. Buckminster Fuller produced theories and contributions to science, architecture, and design that amounted to a sweeping and utopian vision for the future. Self-described as a “comprehensive, anticipatory design scientist,” Fuller sought to alter the landscape of daily life with his prefabricated homes and cutting-edge vehicles. “My objective was humanity’s comprehensive success in the universe,” he once said. His projects include the “Dymaxion” house and car, whose simplicity and adaptability to different landscapes were intended for mass production and efficient living, though neither was ever made widely available. The spirit of Fuller’s inventiveness remains influential to present-day entrepreneurs, artists, and inventors alike.

American, 1895-1983, Milton, Massachusetts, based in Los Angeles, California

About Frank Gehry

One of the most important architects of the 20th and 21st centuries, Frank Gehry is considered a pioneer of Deconstructivism, a movement that exploded the tenets of Modernist architecture, replacing its geometry and rational order with fragmented forms and fluid, non-rectilinear shapes. During his early career, Gehry worked in the International Style established by the Bauhaus and the pioneering French architect Le Corbusier, but was increasingly drawn to the avant-garde communities emerging in California in the 1960s and ’70s. “I think the blurring of the lines between art and architecture has got to happen,” he once said. He began to build furniture from industrial corrugated cardboard and used rough industrial materials such as chain link fencing and aluminium to create more expressive elements in his architectural work. An increasing playfulness of style lead to the design for Gehry’s most iconic building, the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao (1997), whose sweeping curves of titanium are echoed in Gehry’s downtown L.A. building, the Walt Disney Concert Hall (2003).

Canadian-American, b. 1929, Toronto, Canada, based in Los Angeles, California