Robin Day, ‘Robin Day Child Chairs (No. 41)’, 1963, kinder MODERN
Robin Day, ‘Robin Day Child Chairs (No. 41)’, 1963, kinder MODERN
Robin Day, ‘Robin Day Child Chairs (No. 41)’, 1963, kinder MODERN
Robin Day, ‘Robin Day Child Chairs (No. 41)’, 1963, kinder MODERN
Robin Day, ‘Robin Day Child Chairs (No. 41)’, 1963, kinder MODERN

About Robin Day

At the vanguard of postwar British furniture design, Robin Day articulated a clean, modern sensibility and maintained an egalitarian accessibility in terms of use, production, and circulation. Day was a functional minimalist, employing the least number of components necessary to assemble his furniture. His most popular design was a stackable, colored polypropylene chair from 1963 that codified his aesthetic with its durable ergonomic shell, appearing to float on angled, metallic spindle legs. Described as a “humble masterpiece,” Day’s chair spawned many imitators and still pervades contemporary chair design in form as well as its revolutionary use of polypropylene. He frequently collaborated with his wife Lucienne Day, whose textile designs were conceived independently of his furniture, but are nonetheless complementary. The Days are often cited as British counterparts to Ray and Charles Eames.

British, 1916-2010

Group Shows

2015