Rona Pondick, ‘Sweet Tooth (Chocolates)’, 1998, Alpha 137 Gallery
Rona Pondick, ‘Sweet Tooth (Chocolates)’, 1998, Alpha 137 Gallery
Rona Pondick, ‘Sweet Tooth (Chocolates)’, 1998, Alpha 137 Gallery
Rona Pondick, ‘Sweet Tooth (Chocolates)’, 1998, Alpha 137 Gallery
Rona Pondick, ‘Sweet Tooth (Chocolates)’, 1998, Alpha 137 Gallery
Rona Pondick, ‘Sweet Tooth (Chocolates)’, 1998, Alpha 137 Gallery
Rona Pondick, ‘Sweet Tooth (Chocolates)’, 1998, Alpha 137 Gallery

In this work, an elegant wooden box with photographically screened linen opens up to reveal a burst of color and an enticing, sumptuous surprise. Sweet Tooth takes artist Rona Pondick's famous Little Bathers (1990-1991) to a whole new dimension, creating rubber "sweets" in a lavish setting. Known for her provocative sculptures and installations that are simultaneously hilarious and horrific, Pondick combines dissonant fragments of bodies, such as teeth and ears, with pieces of furniture and articles of clothing to make pre-verbal, visceral meanings. Published by the New Museum in a limited edition of only 35. There are no pieces of chocolate missing - the work is designed so authentically, that a few chocolates are supposed to have been "eaten". (see photos).

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Manufacturer: The New Museum, New York

The New Museum, New York, NY

About Rona Pondick

Rona Pondick’s figurative sculptures have evolved stylistically, taking on an increasingly heightened realism since the 1980s, yet the notion of metamorphosis has proved a consistent theme, inspired by Kafka’s psycho-surrealist drama and the ancient mythologies of Egypt and Greece. Accordingly, Pondick’s subject matter, materials, and process are characterized by hybridity: handcrafted elements fuse with computer-enabled techniques and surfaces are often half glossy, half matte. The yellow stainless steel Dog (1998-2001), for instance, features her own face superimposed on a dog’s body, forming a sphinx-like creature. “The first time I merged a fragment of my own body with an animal, a lightbulb went off,” she says, referring to a realization that such hybrids have existed since the Neolithic era. Pondering scientific advancements in cloning and genetic mutations, she adds, “it’s chilling how it all comes together.”

American, b. 1952, Brooklyn, NY, USA, based in New York City, NY, USA

Group Shows

2013
New York,
A Discourse on Plants