Roy Lichtenstein, ‘Black and White Drawings Catalogue 1961-1968 (Brand New Book/Monograph in publishers' shrinkwrap)’, 2010, Alpha 137 Gallery
Roy Lichtenstein, ‘Black and White Drawings Catalogue 1961-1968 (Brand New Book/Monograph in publishers' shrinkwrap)’, 2010, Alpha 137 Gallery
Roy Lichtenstein, ‘Black and White Drawings Catalogue 1961-1968 (Brand New Book/Monograph in publishers' shrinkwrap)’, 2010, Alpha 137 Gallery
Roy Lichtenstein, ‘Black and White Drawings Catalogue 1961-1968 (Brand New Book/Monograph in publishers' shrinkwrap)’, 2010, Alpha 137 Gallery
Roy Lichtenstein, ‘Black and White Drawings Catalogue 1961-1968 (Brand New Book/Monograph in publishers' shrinkwrap)’, 2010, Alpha 137 Gallery
Roy Lichtenstein, ‘Black and White Drawings Catalogue 1961-1968 (Brand New Book/Monograph in publishers' shrinkwrap)’, 2010, Alpha 137 Gallery

ROY LICHTENSTEIN
The Black-and-White Drawings
1961-1968
Isabelle Dervaux
with Essays by:
Graham Bader, Clare Bell, Thomas Crow, Margaret Holben Ellis and Lindsey Tyne
The Morgan Library & Museum, New York
Hatje Cantz, Verlag in association with the Morgan Lbrary & Museum
24 September 2010-2 January, 2011
Albertina, Vienna
4 February - 13 May 2011
1st Edition, 2010
Hardback Catalogue
BRAND NEW IN ORIGINAL SHRINKWRAP-
MAKES A GREAT GIFT!!
We have seen other editions of this uncommon book on the market - but none that are brand new in original publishers' shrink wrap as this.
This elegant and substantial hardback catalogue with no dust jacket exactly as issued was published on the occasion of the above IMPORTANT exhibition of Lichtenstein's drawings - from the most influential era- the early Sixties.
Between 1961 and 1968, Roy Lichtenstein (1923–1997) created some fifty large-format, highly detailed black-and-white drawings that represent one of the most important Pop-Art contributions to the history of drawing. The motifs stem from the consumer world and were radically new at the time, not only in their imagery but also their style, deliberately reminiscent of substandard commercial art. These independent drawings appropriate tawdry illustrations from packaging, advertisements, and comic books and transform them into works of striking visual intensity, tying in to the clean-edge aesthetic of geometric abstraction in the sixties.
This richly illustrated publication provides a new basis for research on Lichtenstein’s early Pop Art years and includes material on the largely unknown 1967 Aspen project, in which the artist transformed a space into a black-and-white cartoon drawing.
For Lichtenstein fans and anyone interested in Pop art, illustration, or cartooning, this collection of the artist's drawings of everyday objects, made during the 1960's and intended as works of art in and of themselves (not as preparation for his paintings), has been gathered by the author, Isabelle Dervaux, and accompanied by various essays examining their style and significance. Dervaux is the curator of modern and contemporary drawings at the Morgan Library & Museum, and the book was published in conjunction with an exhibition of the Lichtenstein drawings at the Morgan.

This hardback volume has 208 pages with 143 illustrations, 139 of which are in color. It measures 11.75 inches (vertical) x 9.75 inches (horizontal.

Note that we have shown interior pages in this listing but the copy you are buying is brand new and never opened!!
NOT ex-library; NO markings whatsoever.
For fans, dealers and collectors of Roy Lichtenstein, for collectors and admirers of art of the Sixties, and for students and scholars of the art of drawing, this is a must-have gorgeous coffee table book, with rarely seen images that add new understanding to the career and oeuvre of this major American Pop Artist.

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Publisher: Morgan Library

About Roy Lichtenstein

When American Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein painted Look Mickey in 1961, it set the tone for his career. This primary-color portrait of the cartoon mouse introduced Lichtenstein’s detached and deadpan style at a time when introspective Abstract Expressionism reigned. Mining material from advertisements, comics, and the everyday, Lichtenstein brought what was then a great taboo—commercial art—into the gallery. He stressed the artificiality of his images by painting them as though they’d come from a commercial press, with the flat, single-color Ben-Day dots of the newspaper meticulously rendered by hand using paint and stencils. Later in his career, Lichtenstein extended his source material to art history, including the work of Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso, and experimented with three-dimensional works. Lichtenstein’s use of appropriated imagery has influenced artists such as Richard Prince, Jeff Koons, and Raymond Pettibon.

American, 1923-1997, New York, New York, based in New York and Southampton, New York

Group Shows

2016
2016
London,
New Tate Modern Switch House: Extension and Installation
2015
Dallas,
International Pop
2015
Miami,
Recent Acquisitions + Highlights from the MDC Permanent Art Collection