Roy Lichtenstein, ‘Champagne Bottle and Presentation Case ’, 1985, Alpha 137 Gallery
Roy Lichtenstein, ‘Champagne Bottle and Presentation Case ’, 1985, Alpha 137 Gallery
Roy Lichtenstein, ‘Champagne Bottle and Presentation Case ’, 1985, Alpha 137 Gallery
Roy Lichtenstein, ‘Champagne Bottle and Presentation Case ’, 1985, Alpha 137 Gallery
Roy Lichtenstein, ‘Champagne Bottle and Presentation Case ’, 1985, Alpha 137 Gallery
Roy Lichtenstein, ‘Champagne Bottle and Presentation Case ’, 1985, Alpha 137 Gallery
Roy Lichtenstein, ‘Champagne Bottle and Presentation Case ’, 1985, Alpha 137 Gallery
Roy Lichtenstein, ‘Champagne Bottle and Presentation Case ’, 1985, Alpha 137 Gallery

Limited edition Roy Lichtenstein designed champagne bottle and presentation case commissioned by Taittinger. Note the bottle is empty with no champagne, and does not have the cap or cork. In very good vintage condition.
About the Taittinger Collection:
The limited edition bottlings that comprise the Taittinger Collection are one of wine and arts’ most coveted collaborations. Each one of the bottles would make a highly seductive addition to any collection, be it one of fine art or fine wine. According to Champagne expert Richard Juhlin, Taittinger (formerly Forneaux) “was among the first Champagne houses when founded in 1734” and “the artist-designed Collection bottles have become a huge success”. The brainchild of Claude Taittinger, the Collection was conceived when he approached Hungarian artist Victor Vasarely in 1983 to commission a piece of original artwork for a small number of bottles from the 1978 vintage. The idea was an instant success, sparking a series of limited edition bottles - selected from only the finest vintages - that have featured work from some of the art world’s great names: 1978 Victor Vasarely, 1991 Arman, 1982 André-Aimé-René Masson (André Masson), 1983 Maria Helena Vieira da Silva, 1985 Roy Lichtenstein, 1986 Hans Hartung, 1988 Toshimitsu Imai, 1990 Guillaume Cornelis van Beverloo (Corneille), 1992 Roberto Sebastián Antonio Matta Echaurren (Matta), 1998 Zao Wou-Ki, 2000 Robert Rauschenberg, 2002 Amadou Sow and 2008 Sebastião Salgado.

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Signature: Lichtenstein's authorized printed signature on the bottle

Manufacturer: Taittinger, Inc.

About Roy Lichtenstein

When American Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein painted Look Mickey in 1961, it set the tone for his career. This primary-color portrait of the cartoon mouse introduced Lichtenstein’s detached and deadpan style at a time when introspective Abstract Expressionism reigned. Mining material from advertisements, comics, and the everyday, Lichtenstein brought what was then a great taboo—commercial art—into the gallery. He stressed the artificiality of his images by painting them as though they’d come from a commercial press, with the flat, single-color Ben-Day dots of the newspaper meticulously rendered by hand using paint and stencils. Later in his career, Lichtenstein extended his source material to art history, including the work of Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso, and experimented with three-dimensional works. Lichtenstein’s use of appropriated imagery has influenced artists such as Richard Prince, Jeff Koons, and Raymond Pettibon.

American, 1923-1997, New York, New York, based in New York and Southampton, New York