Roy Lichtenstein, ‘Girl in Mirror for Art Basel, 1987’, 1987, EHC Fine Art: Essential Editions IV
Roy Lichtenstein, ‘Girl in Mirror for Art Basel, 1987’, 1987, EHC Fine Art: Essential Editions IV
Roy Lichtenstein, ‘Girl in Mirror for Art Basel, 1987’, 1987, EHC Fine Art: Essential Editions IV

Rare promotional print featuring Roy Lichtenstein's iconic "Girl in Mirror" image. Produced for Art Basel in 1987 in an edition of 1000. Stamped en verso, comes matted and ready to frame. Measures 15 x 15 inches with mat

Girl in Mirror perfectly blends the conceptual games and wit that mark Roy Lichtenstein's greatest works. The mirror was an important motif in his work from his earliest days, as he explored and deconstructed how the viewer 'reads' images in the modern, media-saturated world. While he found it easy to paint everyday domestic objects by assembling his characteristic Benday dots, a reflection challenged him more, as he tried to capture the fleeting image that appears on the mirror's surface. In Girl in Mirror, Lichtenstein used the graduation of dots to highlight the face and give a sense of light cast across the reflective surface. He deconstructed the not the 'reality' of the mirror but instead the artistic shorthand by which mirrors are represented. By limiting his use of Benday dots to the face's reflection, Lichtenstein highlights the reflection's artificiality. 'Mirrors are flat objects that have surfaces you can't easily see since they're always reflecting what's around them,' Lichtenstein explained.
--Courtesy of EHC Fine Art

Signature: Unsigned

Art Basel, 1987

About Roy Lichtenstein

When American Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein painted Look Mickey in 1961, it set the tone for his career. This primary-color portrait of the cartoon mouse introduced Lichtenstein’s detached and deadpan style at a time when introspective Abstract Expressionism reigned. Mining material from advertisements, comics, and the everyday, Lichtenstein brought what was then a great taboo—commercial art—into the gallery. He stressed the artificiality of his images by painting them as though they’d come from a commercial press, with the flat, single-color Ben-Day dots of the newspaper meticulously rendered by hand using paint and stencils. Later in his career, Lichtenstein extended his source material to art history, including the work of Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso, and experimented with three-dimensional works. Lichtenstein’s use of appropriated imagery has influenced artists such as Richard Prince, Jeff Koons, and Raymond Pettibon.

American, 1923-1997, New York, New York, based in New York and Southampton, New York